Travel Hacks for Road Trips

Travel Hacks for Road Trips

No matter if you are traveling with children, alone, or just with your furry friend – Road Trips can either be Hell on Earth; or a vacation in and of themselves. So after driving all over the Western United States for most of my life, here are a few Travel Hacks for Road Trips I highly recommend following when planning your own Road Trip at home or abroad.

Download Road Trippers

This is a fantastic app for your road trip, and can also be accessed online to help plan your vacation on the road. I first found and utilized this when taking a Road Trip from Dallas Texas to Nauvoo Illinois. I was going to be traveling through a bunch of open fields. After planning out my route I explored all the spots along the road that had a good rating and found this gem in the middle of nowhere! It is in the Spinach Capital of the United States. A statue of the spinach-eating machine himself has his own little garden and fountain. This also happens to be across from the Police Station, so you have ample entertainment for all!

This app and website are a fantastic way to make those 12 hour drives a little more bearable on the road. From a medical standpoint, it also gives you an excuse to get out of the car every few hours to walk around. People who sit and travel long distances can have swollen legs and blood clots at times as well if they do not walk around sufficiently.

How to stay awake while driving

Get enough rest the night before

Doing this will help you be more alert on the road and less prone to falling asleep at the wheel.

IF YOU ARE TIRED AND START TO LOSE CONCENTRATION THAT IS THE FIRST SIGN YOU ARE AT RISK FOR FALLING ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL.

Pull into a gas station and take a power nap.

I have done this a few times in the past, where I pull into a busy gas station and take a 15-20 min nap. This always helps me feel more refreshed.

Avoid sugary foods or high carbohydrate content as your snack.

When you eat high carbohydrate and high sugar content foods, it starts a vicious cycle of fatigue. Why? Well, you eat that doughnut or candy, your body sees it as too much sugar, so it releases insulin and then drops your blood sugar again. Then you become very sleepy or hungry again, starting the cycle over. I try to avoid sugary foods whenever driving for this reason.

Keep Cool

When I get warm I tend to fall asleep much easier. It is more comfortable to be warm, but I would rather have cold toes and arms before risking crashing my car and killing someone else.

Audiobooks

This is my favorite way to stay awake. Imagine this like the old radios back in the day that would tell the cowboy stories to the children. The children would be so enthralled by the battles and day to day explanations because they didn’t have TV, this was their entertainment.

Audiobooks typically have quality actors and actresses that are able to do multiple accents, voices, and inflections to keep the listener engaged. Yes, some of the audiobooks are entirely too boring and drab to listen to on the road, but there are many that are not.

I personally have signed up for Amazon’s Audible Book subscription for $14.95 per month. I am an affiliate with them, but I have never been more grateful for the positive entertainment value it provides and now listen to them on the way to and from work all the time.

Podcasts

This is something my flatmate is really into. She has several Podcasts that she listens to on a daily basis to and from work. I think this could also work for road trips as well, you may just need to download the podcasts to your mobile device prior to starting your trip.

What are some of your favorite podcasts?

Caffeine

If all else fails, just start swigging Caffeine. Think of all those boring meetings from work you have survived on the sweet nectar of the Gods.

Travel with a friend:

Switching off while driving is really important while on the long road trips and stretches of the road.

Stretches and Facial exercises:

This is an odd one, but I start stretching my legs, toes, fingers, neck, back arms etc…. It keeps your heart rate slightly more elevated than at baseline, thus increasing blood flow to your brain and keeping you refreshed.

Facial exercises also help to keep me awake at the wheel. I open and close my mouth as hard as a can, wiggle my jaw side to side, see how many animal sounds I can make with my tongue etc….

Check road conditions and weather conditions

With the age of the internet came the ability to check your road conditions prior to starting your journey. There have been several instances that I wish I would have, and others where I didn’t and wish I would have.

There was one instance where I didn’t want to leave my parents house to drive back to Las Vegas and did not look at road conditions. I ended up leaving the house when it first started to snow, and by the time I hit Cedar City Utah, I was in a complete blizzard. Traveling at 25 mph on the freeway because of road conditions, and was nearly hit by a snow plow.

Organizing the car

This is paramount for safety while driving. The less distracted you are on the road, the better off and safer you will be.

I will put all the luggage in the very back of the car, the cooler in the middle of the back seat where it is easy for your friend to reach if needed. If you are traveling alone, set up your ‘snack bag’ where you can easily reach it.

Wear sandals

Make sure you have Sunglasses to help with Glare.

If you are driving at night, turn down the dashboard lights. This will help your eyes not feel as tired from trying to adjust to the brightness of the dashboard vs the road.

Have your music or audible book playing before you put the car in drive.

Garbage bag, paper towels, and Kleenex should also be nearby where you don’t have to bend over, reach, or stretch to access them.

Check Your Car for Maintenance

Before you pack anything in the car, make sure your spare tire is filled up and in good condition.

Have a small gas can handy, just in case you miss an exit and the next gas station or turn around isn’t for another 50 miles and you are on empty.

Make sure you check your tire pressure after everything is loaded and in the car.

Change your oil, cabin filter, and engine filter before you go. This will help with gas mileage in your car.

Have your local mechanic esure all fluids are topped off, and the washer fluid is the appropriate one for the area you are traveling to.

I once was driving from Las Vegas to Utah in the snow and went to use my windshield wiper fluid and it froze on my windshield. I had to do an ACE Ventura head out the window to drive to the next town to get it fixed. They had to thaw out the windshield wiper lines with a hairdryer and vinegar, then unplug them. This really cut into my total driving time and was a major stressor. So mention to your mechanic if you find you will be driving to different climates and what they suggest for those areas.

Plan for Gas Stops

Don’t push the car to the point the gas light comes on! I always make a rule for myself that should I take a long road trip where I have never been before I never let the tank get down past 1/4 tank. Even a 1/4 tank is pushing it for me, I typically will fill up at 1/2 tank because I know I will be able to drive for several hours to the next gas station.

Get On The Road Again

Road trips can be a fantastic way to make bonds with friends, and see new destinations. It is important to plan, stay safe and stay awake on the road. There are over 100,000 car accidents per year from people falling asleep at the wheel in the United States. Make sure you know your own limits on when you need a break, even if it is just a mental break. There are plenty of unique things you can see on the road, not every place has to be Instagram worthy. The best adventures will always be the locations that make you feel more fulfilled and productive in your daily life, spark your creativity or help you create a more meaningful connection.

 Happy Travels, Happy Tales & See You On The Flip Side.


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A Guide To A Dog-Friendly Moab

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A Guide To A Dog-Friendly Moab

A Guide To A Dog-Friendly Moab

Moab, Utah is known for being an adventure lovers playground. River rafting, rock climbing, mountain biking, and being so close to not one but TWO National Parks with fantastic views, there is SO much to do! But the national parks don’t allow dogs on their trails, I haven’t gotten around to teaching my dog to ride a bike, she doesn’t have the opposable thumbs necessary for rock climbing, and I don’t think the river guides would appreciate my dog’s nails and teeth on their inflatable raft… so what about for those who want to bring their furry friend along on their trip to Moab? Never fear! There is still PLENTY for you and your dog to do and see! Here is a comprehensive guide to a Dog-Friendly Moab. 

Let’s start with the Dog-Friendly Hikes: 

Dead Horse Point State Park:

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah
Culture Trekking in the Netherlands
  • Shade: Little to none
  • Water: they have to have it brought in by water truck from Moab, so just plan on bringing your own.

While you may not be able to get into Canyonlands National Park with your dog, just a few miles before you reach the Island in the Sky district of the park. There is a small State Park with absolutely STUNNING and dramatic views from above of the Colorado River. Though its name doesn’t inspire these types of images, don’t be deceived: Dead Horse Point State Park is absolutely breathtaking and has 7 miles of different hiking trails (all of them flat and easy to traverse) with both you and your dog.

Learn about the origins of this park’s name, see my Legends of Moab post.

Dotting the path are informational signs, learn about the geology and plant life of the park. I slept peacefully that night after hiking and meeting my “learn something new every day” quota.
 

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah


The park’s facilities include a visitors center, two restrooms (with plumbing!), and even a small coffee stand outside. Two campgrounds, one which includes yurts, you can reserve your spot and view the night in style. With this park being a “Dark Sky” certified park, consider staying the night to go stargazing, see the Milky Way, and watch for shooting stars.
This is a popular park so reserve your accommodation early. There are several first come, first serve spot in one of the nearby Cowboy or Horsethief BLM campgrounds. Just make sure to keep your dog on a leash while in the park. So take that National Park dog haters!

Corona Arch and Bowtie Arch Trail:

  • Distance: 3 miles round trip
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation Gain: 488 feet
  • Shade: none
  • Water: none

Traveler Tip: How to View The Delicate Arch Without the Crowds (from The Wandering Queen)

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah
Culture Trekking in the Netherlands

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WasYs7Obh4
This trail starts from a well-marked parking area next to the Colorado River. It immediately takes you up a few switchbacks to climb up onto the landing where you will get a great view of the river and the canyon. Cross the railroad that goes through a short stretch of a man-made slot canyon (very Instagram worthy!).

Follow the rock cairns to help keep you on the path. Eventually, you will come to a section where both you and your dog will have to channel your inner mountain goat to climb up to the next shelf. But don’t worry! There are foot holes carved into the rock and a rope to help you up. With a little encouragement and coaching your dog should be able to get to the upper level just fine.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah


At the top of this shelf, you will be able to see both Corona Arch (right) and Bowtie Arch (left upper). Make sure to hike all the way under the arch, it will give you a better perspective of the epic proportions of this free-standing monolith. 

Traveler tip: A lot of this hike is over slickrock, which is really good at reflecting heat. This is a great hike during colder months for this reason. During the hotter months, be sure to do this hike earlier on in the morning and bring LOTS of water for you and your dog!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kT_EO2KsPdQ
Across the street from the main parking area for Corona Arch, there is more parking, picnic pavilions, and an outhouse toilet. There are no garbages at the trailhead for doggie bags, so please be considerate: pick up after your dog and just take it with you to dispose of later.

Traveler Tip: In the Big Bend campsite across from the trailhead (next to the river), there is a dumpster where you can take your trash and dog droppings.

Morning Glory Natural Bridge:

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah
  • Length: 4.3 miles round trip
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Elevation Gain: 416 ft.
  • Shade: Morning and evening shade
  • Water: a stream your dog can drink from
Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah

Starting in the parking area next to the Colorado River, this trail follows a stream up a lovely little side canyon. This canyon is formerly known as Negro Bill Canyon, now Grandstaff Canyon. You can enjoy the dramatic red cliffs on both sides as you listen to the birds sing, the gurgle of the stream, and walk under some the of trees that have taken advantage of the little water source. You do cross the stream a couple of times, so unless you and your dog have some acrobatic balancing skills to jump from rock to rock, just expect to get your feet wet.

When you come to the point in the trail where the canyon forks and goes two separate ways, go to the left. The first time I hiked this trail, I got confused and started to climb up, following what looked like a path (probably made by many other confused souls like myself). Just stay down below and follow the stream. At the second fork of the canyon, go right to reach this canyon’s dead end and see Morning Glory Natural Bridge, with the 5th longest span in the world! When you get there, you will be treated to a large, deceiving arch with a spring feeding a little pool directly underneath it.


You can sit there to relax and enjoy the sites and sounds echoing around the dead end of the canyon. At times, you’ll even be able to watch people rappel down between the bridge and the cliff into this little oasis. But be aware of your surroundings! There is poison ivy included in the plant life in this area. Not a ton, but enough you should be aware of the plants so you and your dog can avoid touching it. Just remember: leaves of three, let it be!
This is a popular hike and the main parking area isn’t that big, but there is some overflow parking down and across the street a short way. There is an outhouse-like toilet, no plumbing in the main parking area. And while there are no garbages in the actual parking areas of the hike, next to the overflow parking area is a campground where there is a garbage to throw out your doggie bags.

Poison Spider Dinosaur Tracks and Petroglyphs:

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah
  • Length: 0.3 mile loop
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Elevation gain: 68 feet
  • Shade: none
  • Water: none

Although this is a short hike, it is well worth it for you and your dog. This trail has lots of history includeing the writings of an ancient people and tracks left behind by the dinosaurs that used to roam this area. Against the red rock, both the petroglyphs and the tracks are easy for you to see. Just be prepared to climb up to see both the tracks and petroglyphs. As you start, it won’t be far until you come across the Dinosaur tracks.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah


The slab of rock they are on has fallen from above where the petroglyphs are, so keep going to see the petroglyphs and a few more tracks. There are informational signs by both sites where you can read more information about what you are seeing. An outhouse is available here, but no garbage cans. 

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah

Fisher Towers:

  • Distance: 2-3.9 miles
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation Gain: 1,459 feet
  • Shade: Morning
  • Water: none

This hike is about a 25.5-mile drive outside of Moab, but worth it to see these unique rock formations. The drive itself is pretty spectacular as you are driving through the canyon on Scenic Byway 128. With the Colorado River on your left and the dizzying red cliffs on your right, you’ll wish you were the passenger in the car so you can just enjoy the scenery!
When you get to the trailhead, you will be able to see Fisher Towers immediately. The best perspectives, and viewpoints to really be able to appreciate that enormity of these natural structures comes when you hike the trail itself.

Traveler Tip: Make this hike the ‘go to’ hike if someone in your party is too tired, or has physical limitations. It is a great spot to have a picnic with great views – and provides a fantastic trail for those who want to keep pushing themselves.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah


The view fromt the parking lot along, gives you an idea of why some movie directors chose this location to film scenes for few movies, including:  “John Carter“, “City Slickers“, “Lightning Jack“, “Geronimo: An American Legend“, and “Comencheros” .

The beginning of the trail is a bit deciving because you have to begin the trail heading away from Fisher Towers, down into a canyon, and then turning back towards the Fisher Towers. Three-quarters of the way up the trail, you will get the full perspective of just how massive the Titan (the larger of the Fisher Towers) truly is. At this point you can continue on to the end of the trail where there is another viewpoint of the valley and an ampitheater like rock formation; or you can turn back to head to your next unique adventure. If you are lucky, you may see some rock climbers attempting to conquer the Titan – it is a very popular climbing right of passage.
Facilities available: An outhouse is available but no garbages. There is also a picnic area/campground near the beginning of the trail. It is a BLM campground so, don’t expect water or hookups to be provided.

Jeep Arch (also known as Goldbar Arch):

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah
  • Distance: 4 miles round trip
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation gain: 944 feet
  • Shade: Evening
  • Water: none

Jeep Arch Hike is a unique advneture that not a lot of people know about. About a half mile down the road from the Corona Arch, there is a pull-out on the right side of the road. There is no sign to indicate it is the beginning of the trail, but once you park, go through the culvert that leads under the train tracks.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah


You will see a sign on the other side of the culvert that indicates the beginning of the trail for Jeep Arch. The trail leads you up and to the left. The first 1/8th of a mile of the trail is uphill to get you up on the shelf. After that, the trail is well marked with cairns. About a mile into the trail, there is a sign indicating the trail becomes a loop. You can go either way and it will take you uphill to the arch. If you go to the right, the uphill route is more gradual. To the left, the climb up is steeper and in between the split rocks shown in the picture, but once you do, the rest of the hike to the arch is flat. Either way you go, you can hike through the arch to complete the loop, or just hike back the way you came.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah

This is a great trail to get away from the crowds! I hiked this trail in February, and for the whole hike, I only saw one other person on the last 1/4 mile of the trail. Otherwise, I was able to just take my time and enjoy the quiet solitude of the desert.

Travler Tip: Like the Corona Arch Trail, the majority of this trail is on slickrock which makes it really good at reflecting the sun’s heat. This makes it a great trail for hiking in the winter, but take that into consideration when hiking in summer: hike early in the morning and bring lots of water.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah

There is no garbage can at the trailhead to place your dog’s waste, but since it is so close to Corona Arch and the Goldbar Campground, you can go ahead and use the campground garbage. You can use the toilet facilities at the campground area as well.

Hunter Canyon:

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah
  • Distance: 3 miles round trip
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Elevation gain: 164 feet
  • Shade: most of the day (except midday)
  • Water: Yes. a stream for your dog to drink from (for most of the year)

To get to this trail, on the way from Moab, keep an eye out on your right-hand side for a big boulder with some fencing around it and make sure to stop! This rock is covered in petroglyphs, including the famous Birthing Scene! It’s fascinating to think about the people who engraved their stories into the rock! Who was the lady in the depiction? Was she or her baby a really important person in the tribe? Or was this just a proud father carving a family portrait? I don’t know, but I wish I did! Oh to be a fly on the…..rock?
The parking area for this hike is the same parking area for the small campground that is right at the beginning of the trailhead. As you begin hiking up the canyon from the campground, you’ll be hiking among some of the vegetation that grows along the stream.. You’ll criss-cross the stream a few times and there are some opportunities for you to scramble up huge slabs of sandstone. About a half of a mile into the hike, make sure to look up and to the right to see Hunters Arch. Hiking in this canyon, with its huge, sweeping cliff walls and its stream and vegetation is what makes this a great hike for you and your dog to take.
There is an open-air style bathroom with no door on it, just a sign to indicate if it’s occupied or not. There is also no garbage so be prepared to haul our your dogs mess out with you.

Mill Creek Falls:

Photo courtesy of The Outbound Collective
  • Distance: 0.5-7.5 miles round trip
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation Gain: 629 feet
  • Shade: yes
  • Water: Yes. a creek for your dog to drink from.

Moab in the summer gets HOT! Hiking in summer, of course you are going to be doing most of your hiking in the mornings and in the evenings where the temperatures of the day are coolest, but what about those blistering afternoons? Well because of the waterfalls and swimming holes on Mill Creek Falls Trail, this is a great option to still get some hiking in and take a dip in the cool, refreshing water flowing straight from the La Sal mountains!
The start of this hike is just outside of Moab. Getting out of the car, and starting along the trail, it won’t take you very long at all to get to the first swimming hole and waterfall (man made). If you are looking for just a quick dip to get cool, go ahead and spend some time here to cool off a bit. Make sure to keep going up the canyon, you will find more swimming holes, waterfalls, and see some native american petroglyphs on the cliff side.

Post Hiking Puppy Care: 

Moab Barkery:

I don’t know about your dog, but mine LOVES to play in the dirt and sand! After a long day of hiking in and around Moab, I knew if I wanted my pooch anywhere near my sleeping situation; I would have to give her a bath and wash out all of the red dirt she had collected in her fur.
I tried to wash her off in the hotel tub the first night, but it was a near disaster as she was all over the place! I could barely get her clean enough to call it good enough before she jumped out and tore all over the room in her after a bath frenzy… then there was the wet dog smell that lingered for a long time afterward. So the second day, I decided to give the Moab Barkery a try.

The Moab Barkery is a pet shop in Moab that includes 2 dog baths (one walk-in, one raised) where you can wash off all that Moab dirt. For my 45 lb pooch, it cost me $15 and they provided the apron to save my clothes, bath, shampoo, conditioner, combs/brushes, ear drops, cotton balls, and dryer to dry her off when she was all clean.
Oh my goodness, it was so much easier! I was able to save my back and bathe her in the raised tub, with a special leash so she couldn’t move around all over while I was giving her a bath. The shampoo and conditioner were very nice smelling and made it easy to brush her out afterward. I was able to dry her out with the dryer. They even have some special supplies there 😉 I was able to buy my spoiled pooch a treat and a new toy. All in all, my puppy and I had a great experience here!

Moab Bark Park:

We had spent all of the morning and afternoon hiking around Moab. Finishing around 4 pm, I knew I wouldn’t have time to complete the next trail I had wanted to do before sunset. I dog tired (pun intended), but I wasn’t ready to call it a day quite yet. I knew Moab had a dog park so I looked it up: I found out it’s open from dawn until dusk so I decided to go and let my puppy get the rest of her energy out before we went back to the hotel.

It is a large space with two enclosed areas: a smaller one for dogs up to 30 lbs, and another, larger one for everyone else. It was all red dirt which I didn’t love, but my puppy sure did!  There were plenty of other dogs there for her to frolic with. Several poop stations are available with bags to clean up your dog’s waste. There is also a puppy watering station where for a drink break between play sessions. My sweet dog was exhausted after playing so hard at the Bark Park. We both slept like the dead once we got back to our Hotel.

Dog-Friendly Hotels:

When I first got my puppy, I didn’t think about the fact that my accommodation options would become more limited. My first trip to Moab I researched hotels with the “pet-friendly” filter on.  The frustration quickly mounted, when I would call to double check they would allow my pooch to come and they said they didn’t allow dogs.

Dog Friendly Guide To Moab - Culture Trekking - #DogsinMoab #HikesforDogsinMoab #MoabUtah

As a result of that frustration, I called quite a few of the hotels/motels/etc in the Moab area and asked them three things: 1. If they allowed dogs 2. if they had a fee for pets staying 3. what their cheapest off-season rates were versus their most expensive in-season rates.

The result of that effort is what follows: (USA Country phone code is +1)
Dog-friendly Hotels:             Pet Fee: Price Ranges(Off/On-season)

Days Inn 
(435) 259-4468
$20 per pet/night $59- $299
Gonzo Inn
(435) 259-2515
$30 per night (up to 2 dogs) $99- $199 (my favorite Inn)
Expedition Lodge
(435) 259-6147
Pets stay free $55- $350
Kokopelli Lodge & Suites (435) 530-3134  $31- $186
Motel 6
(435) 259-6686
Pets stay free $50- $229
Under Canvas Moab
(435) 895-3213
 $25 per pet/nights Average price ranges from $226-$303. Open March 8-Oct 30
Homewood Suites by Hilton (435) 259-7000 $50 one time fee $99- $400
Apache Motel
(435) 259-5727
  $70- $137
Big Horn Lodge $5 per pet/night $59- $149
La Quinta Inn & Suites (435) 259-8700 Pets stay Free $99-329+tax
Moab Rustic Inn
(435) 259-6177 
Pets stay free $100- $140- Closed from Dec 1-Feb 1
Silver Sage Inn
(435) 259-4420
 $10 per pet/night $45- $120
Red Stone Inn
(435) 259-3500
 $10/night $80- $166
The Virginian
(435) 259-5951
 $10 per pet/night $79- $149
BLM CampsitesPets stay Free$10- $25

So when you decide to visit Moab with your furry friend, be sure to make your hotel reservations early, bring your poop bags and water for your pooch, bring your camera, and experience Southern Utah, like never before.

As Always, Happy Travels, Happy Tales, and See You on the Flip Side! 


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Hiking in Kodachrome Basin State Park Utah

Hiking in Kodachrome Basin State Park Utah

All you have to do is say a park is dog-friendly and I will be going to visit. Kodachrome has much more to offer than just being dog-friendly though. Kodachrome Basin State Park is unique because of the single monolithic spires that dot the park.

Kodachrome Basin State Park

These rock formations seem to shoot up out of the ground into the air with no reasonable explanation as to why. Some of these spires can rise nearly 170 feet into the air, with different colorations striating the spire making for a unique natural structure. There was one spire that I could not figure out for the life of me if it was a petrified tree or just an odd rock. Arches in this park are, uniquely, on the tops of the mountain rather than closer to the ground like in Arches National Park. The Grosvenor Arch is one of these arches that is located about 11 miles from Kodachrome Basin that is the most well-known arch in this area. A white towering arch that is the perfect place for those epic Instagram photos.

Kodachrome Basin State Park

There are 67 different monolithic stone spires identified in Kodachrome Basin State Park. Geologists are still baffled by their formation to this day. Several theories are circulating as to how, when and why these spires were formed. One of these theories is this area used to be covered in water and over time the area wore the stone down and the waters dried up leaving Kodachrome Basin as we know it today.

How to get there: 

Here is a map I made for you on how to get to Kodachrome Basin State Park. There are two options for those flying in, one to the Salt Lake City International Airport and the other to the much smaller St George Airport. You have another option of flying into Las Vegas and driving three and a half hours to Kodachrome Basin State Park as well. The drive to this area is much prettier driving from Salt Lake rather than Vegas.

Kodachrome Basin State Park

It is an easy drive, but I would not try and drive the route from Salt Lake City if it is snowing. The roads can be very dangerous with multiple slide-offs. If you are coming from Las Vega in the winter, that drive will have clearer roads without snow.

Where to Stay:

Kodachrome Basin State Park
In the Summer

The easiest and cheapest place to stay is typically in the Basic Land Management areas, or the Camping Areas near Kodachrome Basin. Most of these camping areas are very safe to stay in but make sure to keep your dogs on a leash as there are bobcats and coyotes in the area.
Basic Campgrounds can cost you up to $20.00 per night, and you will most likely need cash to pay for these as they are typically envelope drop places. Park rangers come by around 6-7am and check cars for the campsite tickets in the window. The Park Rangers compare it to their list of envelope drops and how much you paid. If they catch you staying without paying, you can get a large fine.

In the Winter:

I would stay in Cannonville at a hotel. Kodachrome Basin State Park can have unpredictable and harsh weather changes at all hours of the day. The temperatures drop dramatically at night and hypothermia can be a problem unless you are properly equipped. Many of the campsites are also closed in the Kodachrome Basin area without restroom facilities.
The hotel that we stayed at was Ruby’s Inn in Cannonville Utah. This hotel is just outside Bryce Canyon National Park and allows dogs both inside the hotel rooms and inside the common areas, but not in the grocery store. If the weather is too harsh, they have loads of activities (both in the winter and in the summer). There is an indoor pool, grocery store, convenience store, shows, restrooms, even a fireplace with cozy chairs and couches that you can crack open a book and feel as if you are staying in a grandiose cabin. Their prices are reasonable, especially in the off-season & there are refrigerators, microwave,  and warm showers to chase away the chill in every room.

Kodachrome Basin State Park

What to do in Kodachrome Basin:

Kodachrome Basin State Park has loads of activities for you to do and experience. With hiking trails, horseback riding trails, mountain biking trails, ATV trails and with all the unique rock formations, is truly a photographers paradise.
Bree (my roommate) and I had so much fun imagining what the rock formations looked like, just as you would imagine shapes in the clouds. There were a few of the rock formations that had us in stitches from laughing.

Kodachrome Basin State Park
Angel’s Palace Trail:

The trailhead is across the street from where you park. In the winter there are no restrooms open, nor are there any garbage cans – so be prepared before you go.
As you start this trail it is deceivingly marked with arrows that point to the right way. Maybe it was because we were hiking this trail in the winter, I don’t really know, but about 1/4 of the way into the trail the arrows started to point the wrong way, the posts had blown over, or there were two arrows pointing two different ways on the fork, but then no other signpost.

What you want to do is get over the hill onto the other side. There is a cliff with an unbelievable view of the valley below. Coming around the corner you are struck with a breathtaking view of a mountain face that begins in a reddish orange and bleeds into a white multi-point peak that without evening knowing the name of the trail, I named it, “Heaven’s Castle”.

Kodachrome Basin State Park

We spent quite a bit of time here, taking pictures, enjoying the view and wishing we could pitch a tent in this spot and forget the world and let nature heal our souls. If you do not have time to do any other trail, this is the trail I would suggest doing. It is 1.6 miles and is fairly easy to hike. It is an exposed trail to the sun, so it is fantastic to hike in winter and will be quite hot in the winter.

Hiking in Kodachrome Basin State Park
Shakespeare Arch

This was the last trail that we were able to hike before having to head back to our real life and resume our adulting duties.
I think I enjoyed hiking this trail more than actually reaching Shakespeare Arch. The trail had fun little areas that you could explore the riverbed and a beautiful view of a surrounding valley. This trail is not well marked and is a 2.6-mile loop. There is no water here for you or your dogs. Most trails in Kodachrome Basin are exposed to the sun, with very little shade.

When we arrived at the Arch, well…….it was disappointing. I almost said out loud, ‘That’s it?! Well…….that’s………cute’. Not exactly a reward for the 2.6-mile moderate hike in, but the views along the way, the dogs enjoying the sand and playing in it & the comedy of Bree getting lost on the trail and almost getting stuck on the edge of a cliff is what made this hike fun for me.

Other hiking trails in Kodachrome Basin State Park
Hiking in Kodachrome Basin State Park

In Summary: 

Kodachrome Basin is definitely a place I will return to, it is off the beaten path. It is unique and has locations that have not been over Instagrammed and feel special when you visit. The colors of this area are striking, and around every corner, you will have both shocking and spectacular surprises.

There is so much to explore in this Park. I would give yourself at least three days to explore all the corners of Kodachrome basin adequately. Bryce Canyon National Park, Dead Horse Point, Moab, Zion National Park are just a short ride away as well, although not as dog friendly.
L

Happy Travels, Happy Trails, and see you on the Flip Side


Where to Stay near Kodachrome Basin

Booking.com

For more posts like this, visit: 

Legends of Moab

Tips on hiking in Zion National Park

How to travel with your furry friend in Moab

Grand Junction Colorado Adventure

Legends of Moab

Discover the Legends of Moab Not only is Moab a great place for Jeep Safari’s, hiking, climbing, river rafting and pretty much anything you can think of to do outdoors. The Legends of Moab & its history are something everyone should know, so that travel becomes not just a grand adventure, but a meaningful and educational grand adventure. Here are some of the Legends and History of Moab that I have recently learned about:

History of Dead Horse Point & its Legends:

This is 5200 acres of beautiful deserts, steep cliffs, and sunsets that will knock your socks off. I didn’t realize this was a State Park actually, so be sure to stop by the visitors center and pay the entrance fee.

Legens of Moab

Where does the name Deadhorse Point come from?

The name Dead Horse Point comes from the story, that in the 1800’s this area was used to herd wild Mustangs. When you walk or drive along the Road you come to an area where, it is said, that a herd of ‘unwanted’ Mustangs was herded into this small area next to the 2000 ft cliff and eventually died from thirst due to the brutality of Drovers during that time.

Legends of Moab


The truth is, that yes the area was often used as a place to herd mustangs because of the natural corrals that were created by the surrounding cliffs. The story has changed over time but really was just that because it was so often used as a herding location, the unforgiving nature of the desert in Summertime caused many horses to die from exposure or thirst. It seems to depend on where you get your information from, which of these perspectives is true…..I will let you decide.

Legends of Moab
Interesting facts about Dead Horse Point:

Beyond the Legend, a rather depressing one at that, this place is an iconic photography location for weddings, landscape photography, and filmmaking. You would have seen Dead Horse Point featured in the final shot of the film ‘Thelma & Louise‘.

Legends of Moab


If you come at sunset, you can get stunning photos of the red rock and play of light and dark on the cliffs and surrounding area. Sunrise is the best time to get the clearest photos of the picturesque Colorado River winding around the canyons.  It is also an ideal place for those who love Mountain Biking, Rock Climbing or hiking.

Legends of Moab


Your hike will begin just at the Visitor’s Center and is 1.5 to 2 miles long with an easy trail, well marked, slight elevation gain. We frequently stopped and took photographs, enjoying the views, to complete the trail it took us 45-minutes, even with all the photography breaks. We took the walk back to the Dead Horse Point Visitors Center, which took about 25 minutes & was accompanied by a spectacularly colorful sunset.

Legends of Moab within Indian writings:

Along Potash Road in Moab, you will find Indian writing and Petroglyphs. These unique and historical drawings are so ancient, that the drawings are typically dated by what is depicted (500 AD for bow and arrows, 1500 AD if horses are seen).

Legends of Moab


I stood in wonder at how archaic these writings are, what their meaning was to the people of that time period & if we will really ever know why exactly they chose to make the effort of carving them into the stone.

Legends of Moab

How were the Petroglyphs Discovered?

Archeologists discovered the petroglyphs prior to construction of Potash Road. There are many other Indian Petroglyphs throughout Moab, to view more of them visit Discovermoab.com where a map will be provided & tips on how to find them.

Legends of Moab


Johnny Depp filmed a portion of Lone Ranger along Potash Road, so if you see the film keep a look out for it.

Dinosaur tracks in Moab:

To see the toe prints of the dinosaurs and more of the Indian Petroglyphs, follow this map and bring your binoculars! One of the few places you can likely see something like this, so don’t miss it!

Legends of Moab Dinosaur Tracks

Legends of Moab and the Fisher Towers:

Located 16 miles South of Moab, with a rather bumpy dirt road that approaches it, is the Fisher Towers. These sandstone giants (of up to 1,000 feet) each have different names, with the largest tower being called the Titan Tower, with the popular climbing route called Sundevil Chimney.

Fisher Towers in Moab


There is not just one tower, but several towers each with distinct names. One of the more famous towers, is the corkscrew tower (part of the Ancient Arts formation), due to its draw for Rock Climbers along the Stolen Chimney route.

Fisher Towers in Moab


These unique natural wonders are 245 MILLION years old! Named after a miner who lived in the area in the 1800’s.  Would you rather have a natural wonder or a celestial star named after you? I like to imagine that he was a great cook of fish stew, told wicked campfire stories, and never gave up his dream of finding copper in those sandstone mountains.

View from Fisher Towers in Moab

Legends of Moab in the Miners Town

In the 1800’s there was a mining town near here. The Mining community consisted of only 75-80 families.  The mining, tragically, didn’t last for very long and most of the families moved to other towns for better work. Some of the mines actually still survive today, although most are too dangerous to explore now.


Where to Stay in Moab:

Booking.com

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Tips on hiking in Zion National Park

Zion National Park was with a friend from school. We were taking Organic Chemistry & just had to get away from the crazy studying that was required. We loaded up the car and headed down in June…..and it was a scorcher. [caption id="attachment_6225" align="aligncenter" width="283"]Angels Landing failure 2.jpg A hot June day on Angel’s Landing[/caption]

My first attempt at Zion National Park
I was riddled with excitement to hike Angel’s Landing, felt like I would be part of the ‘in’ crowd & get to the top and take that one iconic picture that was all over Instagram. Well it was around noon, and it was so hot — I think it was around 102 degrees Fahrenheit (38.8 C) that day. We ended up meeting these guys on the trail that were from Switzerland, as I was huffing and puffing, trying to keep up with everyone. My friend was so patient with me, and all I could think about were these self-deprecating thoughts swimming around in my head. How I wasn’t good enough, how I was so fat that I couldn’t do what I loved and so on and so forth. Well I ended up getting really dizzy and my heart felt like it was going to pound out of my chest, I was not sweating very much, and I didn’t even want to drink any of the warm water that we had brought along with us. I told my friend I wasn’t going to make it, she was so sweet and said she didn’t mind at all because she was getting really hot as well & glad I said something. [gallery ids="6231,6232" type="rectangular"]

Traveler Tip: Two Day Itinerary to Zion National Park (by Contributor: I Live 4 Travel)

The Narrows:
We ended up going to the Narrows, a wonderful hike up a riverbed, complete with swimming holes, beautiful scenery & MUCH cooler environment for me to adapt to. I was glad my friend was able to go on one hike that we both enjoyed. We ended up having a lot more fun on this hike than the other, only because it wasn’t miserably hot. [caption id="attachment_6237" align="alignright" width="402"]Trail Head to the Narrows at Zion National Park The Entrance to the Narrows[/caption]
Traveler Tip: If you plan on visiting Zion’s National Park in June, July or even August you need to start this hike very very early in the morning. Get a Bandana wet so that you have something to keep yourself cool. Bring Gatorade or an electrolyte drink with you. There are several tourists every year that don’t prepare well for the hiking & heat, and end up getting hospitalized for heat exhaustion or heat stroke. There is always one tourist, or someone in a youth group we hear about, that dies from heat every year, so don’t let that be you or someone you care about. Come PREPARED! Don’t be afraid to turn around, your pride is not worth as much as your life.
That is the great thing about Zion, if one hike doesn’t work then you have plenty of options around for every type of traveler, physical condition, hiker preference etc…
Travler tip: There are shuttles that can take you to each trail head and each trail head is clearly marked. Those who are in wheelchairs or have bad knees can wander around the trail head, there are plenty of little trails everywhere for each level of physical health. Be sure to check out the opening hours and times of the shuttles should you need to use them.
[gallery ids="6243,6244,6245,6246,6247,6248" type="slideshow"]
Traveler Tip: In some areas you have to actually swim with your pack overhead to not get your camera wet. Make sure that you have a Protective Water Proof Case. I would also recommend a walking stick because this is a river bed that is very rocky. Bring water shoes, wear your swimming suit. You can turn around at any point on the trail, you can hike for one hour, 10 hours, 16 hours, or 1-2 days depending on your physical capabilities. Make sure you are properly prepared to Hike the Narrows if you decide to go, do not think you know more than mother nature.
When we left, we had some great memories, but I was still pretty bummed and embarrassed about having to turn around on the Angel’s Landing trail. So I made up my mind to not let the trail beat me, and I was determined to go back and tackle it one more time. I started to do some conditioning and training for hiking Angels Landing, which meant A LOT of STAIRS and a bunch of lunges & calf raises.

The Redemption:

It was about 2 years later when I got the chance to tackle the trail again. I went alone this time and just knew that I was going to make it to the top, come hell or high water……or in this case snow. [caption id="attachment_6327" align="alignnone" width="720"]Clouds Looming over Zion National Park Storm clouds at Zions National Park[/caption] It was October, and Utah weather is VERY unpredictable. There is actually a joke here, that if you don’t like the rainy weather, you just cross the street for sunshine. [caption id="attachment_6309" align="alignnone" width="720"]Zion National Park Lodge at Zion’s Lodge watching for lightening[/caption] The storm clouds were coming in, and I stopped at a little unique looking hotel called, Zion Lodge, on the way to Zions. This looks like a great place to stay (if you have the money). The weather didn’t look like it was going to dump any rain, maybe snow, but no lightning or thunder — so I ventured on. (Check out the Safety Tips on Hiking in a Storm) It was the offseason, so I was able to drive right up to where the hike started pretty much and just took my keys, small backpack and some water and started up the trail.
Traveler tip: Things I always keep in my ruck sack , a bandana,  Kind granola bars or Cliff Bar, some bandaids, a whistle, a camera, a phone, a knife and a Light Jacket or wind breaker.
I had my rucksack, my music, my two feet and a heart that knew I was going to conquer. I started on the trail, which was well marked and easy to follow (even for a directionally challenged person). [gallery ids="6305,6306" type="rectangular"] I was so proud of myself I made it to these switch backs, there were plenty of them to make the hike super doable.
Hiking tip: switchbacks often scary for new hikers, but they are actually a really good way to conserve your energy, so you don’t wear out before you get to the top. Switch backs prevent you from having to climb straight up with a rope. For my climbing readers: If you want to climb up to Angel’s Landing, there are a few routes, but you have to have permits, are physically capable of doing it, and that the routes are open. There are about 8 different routes with various degrees of difficulty, but please note that these are typically Trad routes. If you don’t know what that means, then please don’t attempt it.
Once you get past the switchbacks, then you see your first ascent with the legendary chained path. Once you start up this path, especially during the high season, its basically the point of no return (you will see why later). Basically, they are there for you if you should slip, get dizzy from the altitude, or have a fear of heights. [gallery ids="6333,6334" type="rectangular"]
Hiking tip: When hiking on steep surfaces where chains are available, a good rule of thumb is to always keep one hand on the chain at all times. Be patient with those in front of you (and sometimes those behind you). If the people behind you are getting pushy, I usually just try and fart or pretend like I farted & they back off rather quickly, lol — I know, I know – I have no shame, medical professional…. come on.
The path is pretty well worn, but the great thing about sandstone is that it doesn’t typically get slippery from all the foot traffic until it gets wet. So make sure you have good shoes to take with you. I like my Merrell hiking shoes because they have these magical rubber soles that stick to any kind of rock and I have never had a problem with them. If you have weak ankles, then I suggest High top’s on your hiking shoes for support. Once you get past the chains you come to this gut turning sight, a narrow path with sheer drop off’s on each side of the trail. This is why I told you, the prior chained area was a point of no return. At this point, I got a good song on, screamed along with the song inside my head, and just focused on putting one foot in front of the other while I white-knuckled the chain. [caption id="attachment_6338" align="aligncenter" width="454"]Angel's Landing Zion National Park The point of no return at Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park[/caption] There is a reward at the end though….beautiful views with breathtakingly stunning 360 view of Zion’s National Park in all its glory! You can see why it is called Angel’s Landing once you stand in this place. I feel like I took 1,000 photos up here, for more of a reason than just to plaster them on Facebook or Instagram….it was a triumph of fear, self-doubt, and self-deprecating thoughts of my failed attempt at doing this so long ago. [gallery ids="6346,6347,6348,6349,6350" type="slideshow"] I was a little reluctant to share this experience because I was worried people would judge me for finding this hike to be so challenging. I have been finding more and more that I am my own worst critic, and I think we all are. Why do we let ourselves be defeated by our own thoughts? [caption id="attachment_6371" align="aligncenter" width="425"]Hiking Angel's Landing in Zion National Park Celebrating my victory over Angel’s Landing[/caption] Why do we limit our experiences because we are afraid society might think, ‘oh she is so stupid for even attempting this at her [insert comment on physical shape or age]’? Who cares if you look the part of an experienced hiker? Who cares if you are huffing and puffing to the top! Are you taking the photos for your Instagram followers, for yourself, or your posterity? If you stuck with me to the end of this post, you are likely one of the few that take photos for your posterity, for your own memories, for your video or photo journal — as a consistent reminder to yourself that you CAN do it, and you can succeed at anything you LET yourself succeed at. Celebrate your victories, learn from your defeats, but don’t ever give up….find your courage and say, “I WILL NOT LET YOU DEFEAT ME!” Even if we are saying that to our own critical selves. Thank you for taking this hike with me. Honor the best that is within you, make peace with the parts you have labeled as weaknesses, and never ever give up on yourself.

Where is your next hiking trip? 

What is the hardest hiking trip you have ever done? 

What are some tips you would give to new hikers? 

*Please note there are affiliate links within this post, I make pennies off of these links, but wanted you to know that I’m transparent about it — the things I recommend are truly my own opinion. For more information see my full Amazon.com disclosure *

For more hiking stories like this check out How to Hike in Moab with your Furry friend Doggie Packing List
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How to travel with your furry friend in Moab

 Anyone who has traveled with their dog knows the frustration that comes with trying to make the trip go smoothly. When your furry friend is with you, you get rejected at restaurants and hotels, and even trails are restricted to you— even with the most trained of dogs. Here is my experience with traveling with my furry friend in Moab, and it why it was WONDERFUL! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kT_EO2KsPdQ I was moving back to Utah from Texas. I’ve spent the majority of my life in Utah but had never seen one of the major National Parks there, including Moab. I always thought having a furry friend in Moab with you was illegal….. I was wrong. img_6129 Most National Parks don’t exactly like pets, but Utah, being such an outdoorsy state, has plenty to offer for your furry friend. the-gonzo-inn When planning for the trip, I looked at Booking.com and put the ‘dog-friendly’ filter on, and found this great little Inn, Gonzo Inn. It is dog-friendly and there is only a small fee for bringing pets (no fee for service pets). Some of the rooms have fireplaces, which was great for me. When I was visiting in October/November, the nights and mornings were chillier than most. Right outside your back door, you have a rocky area and a small patio that you can let your dog out on. There is also a little doggie play area, which is great. The staff are very helpful and they even watched my dog for me while I ate breakfast at their great breakfast bar. My dog has separation anxiety and howls and scratches the doors pretty bad if I leave her behind, so I have to take her with me, especially if I don’t want to be murdered by the other guests at the hotel. Other tips for this hotel: they don’t allow bikes inside the hotel rooms but they are located in the center of downtown and within walking distance of a few restaurants and grocery stores. For more dog-friendly hotels look here. me and my furry friend in moab In general, dogs are not allowed inside restaurants or any store with food in it. So if you would like to eat something, here are a few tips: bring a cooler with your own food (fridges are in most hotel rooms now), order takeout from a diner, or get fast-food. I was on the road too long to bring my own food, so I ended up taking Zoey into the lobby of a local restaurant and ordered take-out. They didn’t seem to mind, as long as I kept her in the waiting area. In the summertime, I’m sure you can sit outside on the patio area of most restaurants with your furry friend. [caption id="attachment_4330" align="aligncenter" width="451"]at Corona Arch with my furry friend in moab Corona Arch in Moab Utah[/caption] The next day we hit the trails and I wanted to definitely see an Arch and didn’t want to leave Zoey behind. We were only going to be there for one day, so I decided on Corona Arch & Negro Bill Canyon. [gallery ids="4331,4328" type="rectangular"] Corona Arch trail is an easy 3-mile trail with a few steep spots that were hard to navigate. There is also an open field where it was hard to find the trail, but if you follow the stacked rocks, you can usually find your way pretty easily. We rounded a corner and you could see the Arch from further away. There is a 7-foot ladder you have to climb up in order to get to the Arch itself, and with me being 5’4″ and trying to lift my 17 lb squirming dog that hates to be held up… that just wasn’t going to happen. Next time, I will bring a bag to stick her in, climb up the ladder, and take her out of the bag. That is the only way I could think of to actually reach the arch with Zoey. [gallery ids="4334,4327" type="rectangular"] The sun in the winter goes down rather quickly, especially in Utah, but I wanted to get one more hike in. I decided on Negro Bill Canyon Trail.  This is a gorgeous and easy 5-mile hike. I get a little nervous hiking that close to sunset, but with a little help from other hikers on the trail, we made it there and back quite easily. [gallery ids="4344,4339,4338" type="rectangular"] Along this trail, you will find a little stream with several easy crossings. Your furry friend’s feet will get wet though, so make sure you have something to cover the seat with when you put them back in the car. When you get to the arch, be aware and cautious to not let your dog go into the brush along the trail or roam free. There is quite a bit of Poison Ivy along the trail, especially at the bottom near the arch, and if your furry friend rubs that along their belly then they can suffer the same symptoms we do. When you get to the Arch, it just looks like another part of the mountain but if you go up close and underneath it, you are able to see how massive and impressive it is. [gallery ids="4323,4410,4411,4412" type="square" columns="2"] Overall, it was a PERFECT trip with her and I will never forget those bonding moments we had while we were there together. If you plan on staying longer than I did, here are some other hikes that were suggested to me: Moab Rim Trail, Amphitheater Loop, Dellenburgh Trail, Fisher Towers Trail, Grandstaff Canyon, Hidden Valley Trail, Hunter Canyon, Ken’s Lake Trail, Longbow Arch Trail, Poison Spider Bench, Portal Overlook Trail, Stairmaster, Sylvester, and Trough Springs Trail. If you want to go on a hike that does not allow dogs, there are several doggie daycares in town that seem to have pretty good reviews. Moab Barkery is the doggie daycare I would likely look into if I were to have Zoey stay somewhere. It has 22 reviews with a 4.6 average rating And it is right near the center of town. [caption id="attachment_4333" align="alignnone" width="3264"]my furry friend in moab Zoey posing and very excited for her adventure in Moab[/caption] Last but not least, don’t forget to pack the doggie turd in, and pack it out. Please keep your pup on a leash so as to avoid antagonizing other dogs on the trail.

Happy Travels, Happy Tales, and See you on the Flip Side. 


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