The Dead Sea Minerals, Scrolls and more…

The Dead Sea Minerals, Scrolls and more…

Reading Time: 8 minutes

Stretching 60 miles along Jordan, Israel and the West Bank shores is the Dead Sea. Rich with history, festivals, Dead Sea scrolls, and the health benefits surrounding the Dead Sea Minerals – it is a luxurious natural spa that you shouldn’t miss while visiting Israel or Jordan.

This is the lowest place on earth, measuring at 1412 feet (430.5) meters below sea level. I was on a tour bus with 50 other people and sat in the same spot as I did on the school bus in High school…..at the back. 

We were traveling from the Jordanian border into Israel. We were planning a stop at Masada, the former palace of Herod, and the tragic story of the Jewish community trapped there by the Romans. Then would spend the afternoon exploring the Dead Sea.

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What I didn’t have the foresight to see, was the winding roads all the way down to the lowest points on earth at the back of a bus. I don’t get seasick on ships, I don’t get sick at the sight of blood and have a blunted sense of smell from working in the Operating Room for six years. This bus trip down to the Dead Sea was terrible, I turned Green, had my plastic bag ready in front of me and sat on the bus floor in the front of the bus trying to not let me entrails become my ex-trails.

Traveler Tip: Always bring hand sanitizer with you on trips, especially if you get sea sick or car sick. There have been studies in those in Post-Operative recovery periods that have shown smelling rubbing alcohol helps decrease nausea. Hand sanitizer has the same affect, so keep a small bottle with you for emergencies like this.

How to Get To the Dead Sea

There are plenty of ways to visit the Dead Sea. There are plenty of tours offered to the Dead Sea, here are a few options:

1- From Jerusalem

2- From Tel Aviv

3- From Amman

For those who are staying in Jerusalem and have an extra day, there is a shuttle bus that leaves regularly from Jerusalem to the Dead Sea. This shuttle costs about $45 per person round-trip, departing Jerusalem in the morning and leaving the Dead Sea in the afternoon. The $45 does include the $24 entrance fee required to enter the Dead Sea.

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Why Visit the Dead Sea

For the History

The earliest name for the Dead Sea comes from the Book of Genesis in the Bible called ‘the Salt Sea’.

Once the Roman Era came about, Salt was a source of trade – even more so than silver or gold. Emperor Trajan controlled every entry point into this valley at one point and would tax the traders, who would bring the salt out of this lake, in salt, not coin.

There have also been many Biblical fugitives that found refuge in this area. Some of these fugitives you may know like David, Jesus, Christian Monks, and Jewish Zealots to name a few. It is also rumored that at the South end of this sea, is a salt rock formation that is said to be Lot’s wife. As the city of Sodom and Gomorrah were being destroyed, she disobeyed God’s instruction to not look back – so he turned her into a pillar of salt.

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For the Health Benefits

Researchers claim that there are eight times more minerals in the Dead Sea than there are in any other sea. The mineral concentration and the unique atmospheric climate are what makes it uniquely beneficial for the skin.

Surprisingly there is scientific evidence that proves the Dead Sea can help treat a host of illnesses: joint pain, arthritis, psoriasis, and heart problems. I have not personally researched the legitimacy of these reports and who funded these studies, so take it with a grain of salt (pun intended).

At the very least, it does make your skin quite soft and after my shower, I did feel incredibly relaxed and zen-like.

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Concerns over the dying Dead Sea

Three generations of Jordanian Farmers live on the shores of the Dead Sea. A man reported that when he was a child his Father’s fields were just a few feet from the Sea. Now the Dead Sea shoreline is over a mile away, in 20 years he worries there will no longer be a Dead Sea- and he will be forced to abandon his fields.

In just 50 short years, the Dead Sea has dropped nearly 112 feet. Mostly because of river diversions and the decreased flow of the Jordanian river that used to feed the Dead Sea.

What is more alarming are the sinkholes that have started to appear as an after effect of the erosion of land, landslides etc… The sinkholes can be anywhere from a small room to the size of a soccer field and up to 114 feet deep (34 meters).

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If that isn’t bad enough, with the decreased water flow, the evaporation’s from the Dead Sea that would help feed nearby farming fields with the morning dew are now starting to die off.

So could we see the end of the Dead Sea in the next 50-100 years? This is why it is important to me to be aware of the environmental impact I have as a traveler to the places I visit. It isn’t just about the photo or the experience, it is also very much about being aware of the cultural impact my visit has on the locals.

What to Expect when visiting the Dead Sea?

I don’t handle humidity very well at all, and near the water is worse than visiting Masada. I can run outside in Las Vegas in 99F weather and be fine, but even 80 degrees with anything above 30 percent humidity and could rival the Wicked Witch of the West in melting under water.

MonthHi temp
F/C
Low temp
F/C
Humidity %
Sun hoursRainy days
January69 / 2054 / 1241 3
February71 / 2156 / 1338 3
March77 / 2561 / 1633 2
April86 / 3070 / 2127 1
May95 / 3477 / 2524 0
June100/ 3781 / 2723 0
July104 / 3986 / 3024 0
August102 / 3986 / 3027 0
September98 / 3683 / 2831 0
October90 / 3276 / 2433 0
November80 / 2766 / 1936 1
December71 / 2157 / 1441 2

I know I am not the only one with this issue, because when visiting the Dead Sea with the tour group – the temperatures were scalding hot in May for me. The bathrooms were incredibly hot and muggy from the showers that were going. With my Asthma I felt a bit claustrophobic and yet can go Scuba Diving.

There was sand and mud everywhere, flies buzzing about, and no protection from the sun other than the cafe – where you had to buy a drink in order to sit under the shaded patio.

Needless to say, that getting into the Dead Sea and changing into my swimming suit with a sticky/sweaty body was not the most pleasant part of this experience. I quickly trudged my way down to the water’s edge in my shoes and dropped my gear by some folks from the bus that chose not to get in. The offered to take a few photos of me in the water, which I’m glad they did, because I wouldn’t have had any otherwise.

The water itself is lukewarm yet cool, refreshing and a bit tingling from the salinity of it. My skin felt as if it was going to drip right off my back from the sun, so I reached in and put some mud all over my exposed skin. Ahhhhh……finally…..I felt cool and relaxed and it was lovely. A smile broke the sour face I had and I wanted to stay for hours. I attempted to float in the water, and it was an extraordinarily unique feeling to be weightless. I had to convince the instincts of my mind to not feel the need to ‘paddle to survive’.

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Unfortunately, my blissful moment was short-lived, as the water felt as if it was starting to burn my skin. I piled more mud on my skin, and it didn’t help, so I reluctantly washed the mud off as best I could in the murky waters of the Dead Sea Coast and made my way to dry land.

I quickly made my way out of the unforgiving sunshine and headed into the showers. The panic of not being able to breathe was just slightly less pressing as the stinging of my skin – so I quickly stripped down my bathing suit and washed off. They do have private changing rooms available, and each shower has a curtain for modesty.

Traveler Tip: Be sure you bring some of your own soap, they have some you can buy there but everything is quite expensive due to the remoteness of the Dead Sea.

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Precautions when Swimming in the Dead Sea

A few things to precaution you about if you choose to float in the Dead Sea.

1- You cannot get the water in your eyes. It is very dangerous and would require medical care should you get water in your eyes (per our Israeli guide).

2- If you have sensitive skin, I would not swim in the water. They have spots where there is just mud, that is said to be beneficial and give you soft skin — but I get the same soft skin from a good Bath Bomb.

3- If you have a long drive to your next destination, you will have mud and sand in places that are uncomfortable and difficult to get out. For some reason, on me, I felt the mud was more difficult to get off of me than the regular mud you encounter in a forest. I don’t know the chemical mechanism behind this (? electric charge), but I had a very long shower once I got to the hotel in Tel Aviv.

4- DO NOT, I repeat….DO NOT attempt to enter the Dead Sea just at any shoreline. You will get sucked up into one of the sinkholes and there will be no rescue of your body as it would put emergency responders in too much danger to try and fish you out.

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Things to Do Near the Dead Sea

1- Masada the retreat of Herod the Great, and stronghold of Jewish Zealots

2- Kalia Beach at the Dead Sea

3- Ein Bokek Beach at the Dead Sea

4- Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls National Park

5- Ein Gedi Nature Reserve & Botanical Garden (less crowded is Wadi Arugot)

6- Tamar Festival at Masada (Music Festival)

7 – Veredis Desert Challenge Festival (Mountain Biking races) – this brings together Israelis and Palestinians.

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What to Pack when visiting the Dead Sea

swimming suit, loofah sponge, gel soap with exfoliating beads, microfiber towel, hat, sunglasses, baby wipes, change of clothes.

Places to Stay Near the Dead Sea

Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Amman, Galilee, Petra

Dead Sea Products:

I found the products that are sold in the Dead Sea Products store online. They are far cheaper through Amazon than they are in that store. 


If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy:

The Ultimate Guide to the Top 25 Things To Do In Jerusalem (Self-Guided)

An Interview with Jordan : How to Tour Jordan and so much more

The Space Between Israel and Palestine, a Fragile Peace

The tragic history of love, courage, and loss: Masada

Sailing on the Sea of Galilee

The Ultimate Guide to the Top 25 Things To Do In Jerusalem (Self-Guided)

The Ultimate Guide to the Top 25 Things To Do In Jerusalem (Self-Guided)

Reading Time: 34 minutes
Top 25 Things To See in Jerusalem -Culture Trekking - #ThingstoseeinJerusalem #Jerusalem #VisitIsrael

The history of the wars, changing hands, religious changes, celebrations, brutality has been ongoing up until the present day. As Archaeological digs continue, more facts about those who lived in this ancient city are becoming more clear and ever-present.
The argument of who has the official rights to the city is beside the point, the point is, is that with such a tumultuous past in the name of control and religion; it is very hard to visit this city and not be keenly aware of the fragile peace between Israel and the Palestinians.

To give you a better idea of just how passionate not just it’s residents and citizens are here are my Top 25 Things to See in Jerusalem; and how to be culturally sensitive to both groups when visiting.

1- Visit the Temple on the Mount

This is the place where you will find the most tension, yet the most spirituality between the two current clashing religions.

Separate entrances for men and women guard the way into the Temple on the Mount. You can go to the left and visit the wailing wall, where prayers are poured in by the 1,000’s weekly.

Janiel in front of Western Wall in Jerusalem on Women's Side

The wall is the remnant of the outer wall of the second temple of Jerusalem – which was not originally part of the Temple only surrounded it. The Second Temple of Jerusalem was originally built by King David around 70 CE. The wall measures 160 feet (50 m) long by 60 feet (20m) high and extends well below the part that is visible to us today. For nearly 1,000 years, the area was used as a garbage dump to humiliate the Jews, but after The Jewish people believe that the presence of the divine has never left this place.

Jewish Woman Praying at the Western Wall in Jerusalem

Prayers are offered up in mourning for the temple that was destroyed and pray for its restoration. To the Jewish people, it is called Kotel ha-Ma’aravi, this place is so well visited you can see that the granite flooring is polished from so many feet walking on it. Prayers are stuffed into every crack that can reasonably be reached. Male children are taught the word by their Father’s and Grandfathers.

The women are not allowed to hold prayer meetings at the wall, nor can they wear prayer shawls here. There have been demonstrations with Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men who believe that prayer circles can only be held and led by men.

Men Reading from the Torah at the Western Wall in Jerusalem
Religious Garb of Jewish Men while reading the Torah at the Western Wall


Some reports of prayer meetings being broken up by chairs being thrown, women being arrested for bringing prayer scrolls to the wall etc… However in 2016, space was created for women and men to worship together at the southern end of the wall known as Robinson’s Arch; and the first co-ed prayer was held there on February 25, 2016.

Walkway to the Temple on the Mount

If you head back towards the entrance, you will see a wooden walkway guarded by two armed guards. This is the entrance to the Al Aqsa Mosque, one of the seven pillars of the Islamic faith. It is the third most holy site for them behind Mecca and Medina. This is where Mohammad made his ‘night journey’ to the throne of God. The square on top of the mount, also known as Temple on the Mount, can accommodate up to 5000 worshipers.

Dome of the Rock


It was originally built around 710 AD, but collapsed into ruin about 5 different times from Earthquakes, having to be rebuilt each time. Crusaders took over the area and used the temple as a headquarters until Saladin re-conquered the city. The crusader’s embellishments were torn down except for the Southern portion that is used as an Islamic Museum and Women’s Mosque now.

Woman at the Dome of the Rock

Visitors were previously able to peer inside the Mosque during visiting hours, but after a crazed Christian man (allegedly) set a fire inside and destroyed the 12th-century table of Saladin’s….all non-Muslim visitors were banned from entering. Now you can only visit the Temple on the Mount during certain hours, it can close without warning for protecting it, it is closed on Friday and Saturday as well. If you visit, women need to have their hair covered (out of respect) have modest clothing, you cannot wear anything Jewish or bring anything Jewish related with you onto the Mount.

Despite the perceptions of these two religions, as visitors, we should be respectful of their beliefs and abide by their rules. If you keep an open mind, and an open heart – you will see just how spiritually uplifting those so incredibly dedicated to their different causes can be just in observing them.
The tensions between these two predominant religions within the city go back centuries. The most current disputes are the same as they have always been, but are still seen frequently between believers. While we were there learning about the history of the Mosque, it was the Jewish Independence day, and Jewish people are not allowed on or near the Al Aqsa Mosque. This day, however, about 20 men dressed in traditional Jewish garb formed a line and started to walk towards Al Aqsa Mosque. Those who were praying in fervent prayer, arose from their places of worship and slowly started walking towards these Jewish men crying out ‘Allah Aq Bar’, meaning God is Great. You could feel that the tension was there, and the Palestinian men in arms formed a barrier between the Jewish men and those walking towards them. Our guide hurriedly asked us to follow him, education on the Mount hastily halted and we were ushered down a side exit where our guide had a key.

Decoration on the Dome of the Rock

I left that place with both peace and sadness for the two parties that have been warring for so long. I can see both sides of the argument, each side wants justice for injustices they feel have been inflicted upon them. There is a fragile peace between Israel and Palestine, that is not easily explained, is incredibly complicated and may not have a solution for thousands of years to come.

2- King David’s Tomb & Tower

I didn’t really understand what this tomb meant to the Jewish people when I visited, or why the different areas needed to be separated. Why was King David so important to the people?

Woman sitting near King David's Tomb in Jerusalem
Woman sitting near King David’s Tomb in Jerusalem

This is one of the holiest sites for the Jewish people, he is celebrated as the warrior King of Israel. He is revered not just for his warrior spirit, but also for writing many of the Psalms in the Old Testament. For Christians, the room above King David’s Tomb is the room where the Last Supper is Traditionally said to have been held.

While archaeological digs have yet to reveal the actual resting place of the warrior King, Jewish people will traditionally worship him here. It is a tiny cramped room, only allowing a few people in at a time. The room is further split into two sections, one for the men and one for the women to worship. The entrance hall to the tomb is traditionally where Jesus is said to have washed his Apostles feet as well. The walls surrounding the tomb of David is also said to be known as the church of the Apostles because of the dating of the walls surrounding it as well.

Jerusalem Churches with different religious symbols

The Jordanian rule of the Temple on the Mount and all surrounding areas did not allow Jewish believers to visit the Western Wall; they ended up worshiping here instead.

3- Visit the Church of the Nativity a UNESCO Heritage Site

The Ultimate Guide to the Top 25 Things to See and Do In Jerusalem
Sermon at the Church of Nativity in Jerusalem

While not exactly in Jerusalem, I still wanted to put this one on the list as it is in Bethlehem which is 6.2 miles (10 km) south of Jerusalem….the Church of the Nativity. This is the traditional site (since 2 A.D.) of where it is believed that Jesus was born. As religion morphed and grew, a Basilica was placed over the site in 339 A.D. The current church overlaying that basilica is from the mid 6th century.

Before visiting Jerusalem, I hadn’t really done my research on what to expect when visiting these holy places. I would caution you to not go expecting to see a humble stable or peaceful place of worship. There are three different religions who occupy the same space, with such tensions arising over the control of the religious edifice that a treaty had to be signed that joint custody of the building is shared among the groups. It can get quite crowded, and people are extremely passionate about not having you in front of them to see the sacred areas. I would humbly suggest, just wandering the building and seeing all the adornments of the building, as they are just as impressive.

If you head under the chapels and kingly adornments, there are some small and simple stone chapels underneath the church – just as it would have been during the time of Jesus. Here you can quietly sit and contemplate the life of a man that means so much to nearly every religion in the world.
If you are near the Church during Christmas time, the Pilgrimage Route is walked, led by three of the religious leaders along the path that Mary and Joseph (Jesus’ parents) walked on their way to Bethlehem. The road connects the traditional entrance of Bethlehem, with the Church of the Nativity, and extends along Star Street through the Damascus Gate (the historical gate of the town) towards the Manger Square.

4- Visit the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in the Old City of Jerusalem

This site is very important to Christians the world over, as it has been held as the traditional site of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ since the first Crusade. While the site itself was originally a Temple to Venus; the Temple of Venus was torn down by Constantine and a stone grave was found here. This grave was assumed to be the Tomb of Jesus, a Holy Relic of a remnant of the cross he was crucified on was said to have been found here.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem
Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem


While tradition holds this to be the site where Jesus was crucified throughout the centuries, archaeological scholars argue that it may have been elsewhere in the city. Mixing science and religious traditions is always a dangerous venture so I won’t go too heavy into this, but just know that throughout Israel – holy Christian sites are constantly being argued and trying to be proved or disproved.

The Stone where Christ was laid in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem
The Stone Where Christ layed after his Crucifixion
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Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem


To me, this place was an absolute madhouse, in the best and worst ways (at least for me). There were women crying with shawls on their heads, rubbing clothes and scarves over the stone on the ground (believed to be the stone where Jesus was laid after his crucifixion). While I don’t understand the intricacies of interpretation in each religion, this particular practice took me off guard. In my own practices, I traditionally am quiet, reserved, and quietly contemplate religious ideals and offer a private prayer within my heart to that which I believe – as I feel this is the most reverent way to honor that which has gone. I do know there are some religions that the more you weep and wail, the more you show you miss the person. Maybe this was part of that ceremony of death that is associated with certain religions, maybe it was just these individuals….I don’t really know. It taught me something seeing it this way though, these women were worshiping in the best way they knew how and what was true for them. I decided I couldn’t fault them for that— and politely let them worship as I moved through the crowd trying desperately to find a break in the mayhem of tourists.

The buildings were so large, the spaces were so crowded, I couldn’t even feel peace and my brain was not allowed a time to ponder. It was very disconcerting and a part of me was frustrated that I was not able to find a place to think. There was incense being burned in a chapel I passed which triggered my Asthma and then my anxiety set it. I immediately told my guide I needed to leave just so I could breathe easier – and quickly found the exit.
I think that the most spiritual part for me, was when I left the building. Seeing people from all walks of life flood into this place to worship, take photos, rub their scarves on the stone, shed a few tears of grateful joy is what impressed me the most.

In a time of social media, popularity contests, and bragging rights……with all the efforts people impart to ‘be remembered’ – a man born into a stable has survived the test of time. How would it be to have wars fought for you and in your name? How would you feel to have people weeping at your coffin thousands of years after you died? It deeply impressed me that so many people, after all this time, still felt so much for a humble carpenter. It was very moving to see how it brought us all to the same space to worship the same thing. Now if we could just remember to do the same thing in our day to day lives, would we still have wars? If we truly sat down and focused on what was important.
In Israel, however, clashes over the Holy Sepulcher still continue to this day and may continue throughout all of time, unfortunately.

5- Visit The Israel Museum

Here you will find the replica of the Holy Land and how it looked in the day of Christ. It is quite impressive in its detail, scale, and replication. Be sure you get an audio guide, or have a Biblical Historian with you, to give you an idea of each of the areas within this Ancient Holy Land replica and what stories they correlate within the Bible.

Israel museum


It was startling how much it helped my understanding of where things were and how the land was laid out. It is much like an ancient Google Maps, where you can get a better idea of and trace the steps of Jesus Christ. Even how the land behaved during rainstorms, how they collected water to bathe, where the different bathing pools were for each social class. Then you see where they dumped their storage, where the Second Temple of the Jewish people was located – so when visiting the Temple Mount you can imagine what it may have looked like.

Model of the Ancient City of Jerusalem at the Israel Museum

I can’t wait until they have an interactive movie on the Bible stories, where you can enter a 3D version of it – and watch it all happen as if you were a member of the crowd or a religious follower. (Ahem….can someone please give this to the appropriate powers at be, and try to make this happen, lol).

Shrine of the book

The most important collection in this museum, are the Dead Sea Scrolls. These are scriptural texts that were found near the Dead Sea (in Wadi Qumran) around 1947, yet the age of the scrolls themselves date back nearly 2,000 years.

When a young Bedouin sheepherder was climbing through the cliffs and found a crevice to which he threw in a rock to see how deep it went. He was surprised to hear something break inside. After a series of events, the scrolls were sold to a few different antiquities dealers and eventually led to the Israel Museum acquiring them for preservation and ability for all faith’s to witness the greatest find of the 19th century. The earliest translation of these scrolls led to three being published: The War Scroll, the Thanksgiving Scroll (Hodayot), and a second copy of Isaiah.

qumran limestone caves


Since this that time, thousands of Scroll fragments in 10 additional caves—in total the remains of over 900 manuscripts have been found. These scrolls are being preserved and revered by thousands in the Shrine of the Book, located within this Museum.

6- Visit the Shepard’s Field

This is a quaint place to visit, and our guide gave us some incredible insight into the lambs that were kept in these fields. It was incredibly important to have sacrificial animals for the Temple in Jerusalem (the Second Temple, which was still being utilized prior to the death of Jesus Christ). The lambs kept in this field were the best of the best, and even the Shepard’s were specifically chosen for the task of caring for the animals for the Temple.

The Shepherd's Field in Jerusalem

I find it very fitting that these were also the same Shepard’s that were asked to visit the babe in a manager. The symbolism of this is remarkable if you sit and ponder on this for a while.

The Shepherd's Field in Jerusalem

Traveler Tip: There is an incredibly good Restaurant right near here (I don’t remember the name), but it has the best Mint Tea and Hummus in Jerusalem (of what I was able to try – and I ate A LOT of hummus).

7- Witness a Bar Mitzvah

While visiting the Temple on the Mount, if you go on a Friday – you can see a Bar Mitzvah! This is where a thirteen-year-old Jewish lad is celebrated for his reaching an age where he is spiritually, emotionally, and physically ready to observe the commandments of the Torah.

Bar Mitzvah Celebration in Jerusalem

If you directly translate this, it means son/daughter of the Commandments. Celebrating a Bar Mitzvah is not a commandment, but more of a tradition of the Jewish people. A Bar Mitzvah is for a boy, and a Bat Mitzvah is for a girl. Head to the Western Wall on a Saturday morning and you may see several of these celebrations.

Bar Mitzvah Celebration in Jerusalem

They are hard to miss, as they are typically accompanied by drums, horns, music and large canopy over them, or raised upon the shoulders of his family members. It is really quite a party, and cheering as the boy passes by with his family, or clapping to the music is encouraged 😉

8- Visit the Church of St. Peter in Gallicantu

Don’t skip over this one! While it is a church dedicated to Peter’s denial of Christ three times, and then reconciliation – there is something even more interesting. This is the traditional spot where Jesus Christ was believed to be held before his trial and subsequent crucifixion.

There is an argument among archaeologists on this point, but if you descend into the stony pit and look up at the hole where prisoners were lowered; you can see a crusaders cross painted on the edge of it. The painted cross has been dated, and the slots in the surrounding stone where prisoners were tied are consistent with the time period of Christ.

9- Visit the Brigham Young University Jerusalem Center for a Concert and incredible views of Jerusalem

This is not a well-known site to visit, but is a unique center where you can see how Olive use to be pressed – and is (at times) still utilized for educational purposes. Walk among the beautiful garden with incredible views of Jerusalem.

Here you can also learn about how education about the dynamics of the different religious factions within the city are functioning, their belief systems, and you will be able to learn of the intricacies of their beliefs.
If you are looking for relaxing things to do in Jerusalem, you may want to plan your visit for a concert here. If you would like more information on their concert series, email: concerts@jc.byu.ac.il

10- Visit the Bible Lands Museum

Ancient Egypt

Although it is rated as the number ten, in Museums to visit on multiple travel sites I still think it is worth a visit. Every single room, artifact, and a display is geared towards educating those from every religion about what biblical life was like. The artifacts and displays are correlated to the different books and time periods, the oldest artifacts dating back to 1550 B.C.E. For me, it was the perfect ending to my two week trip on the Holy Land.

I had learned so much throughout the week, and the museum itself was not as crowded as the cathedrals, basilicas and other museums I have been in. Having this be my last stop on my tour really brought the whole Biblical picture together for me. I am a visual learner, so being able to envision what they utilized when working the fields, the type of adornments they used etc…. really brings the stories alive (at least for me).

11- Visit the Yad Vashem: Holocaust Memorial Museum

This was the most moving museum I have ever been into in my entire life. I felt hopeful walking in, refreshed I could do this Museum alone and not in a large group. Take my time reading the descriptions, and really soak in the atrocities that happened to the people who occupied this land now.

Memorial to the Jewish Children


Traveling through the Museum itself is like walking through an interactive art piece. You start by seeing all the fun commercials that were shown during that time period. What Jewish life in Germany was like before the war. Then you notice that the newspaper articles start to make racist jokes, commercials begin to portray Jewish people in offensive ways and the subtle rhetoric used. It made me realize how powerful marketing is, the subtle jokes or messages can influence a way an entire country thinks. If I had never met a Jewish person in my life, then I would have wondered if this is how they truly were.
Making your way through the Museum, the messages get darker, the Jewish stars come out, and you crisscross over bridges to the very end. Each bridge you cross brings you to a different level of oppression and eventually you witness the heartache caused by this genocide. Memorials to those who were taken from this world by monsters that were totally convinced what they did was for the good of their country.

Jewish Memorial

I personally had to skip through some of the videos, and memoirs….by the end I was totally sick to my stomach and had to take breaks on the bridges to continue. With my background working in a Trauma 2 hospital on the night shift, I have seen my share of gore and had to notify families that loved ones have passed. Those nights in the hospital didn’t have the kind of effect that this museum did on me. I couldn’t finish going through the museum, it was too much for me personally. I did go to the memorial portions of the Museum, and when I finally reached the Memorial to the Jewish children that were murdered during the war…..I stood in this dark room full of candles and cried.

Entrance to the holocaust Museum

Cried for the war then, cried for the ongoing war in the Holy Land – and something in me changed that day.
I won’t go into the deeply personal changes that happened within me, but I knew that I wanted to show more love, inclusive, and stand up for those who are oppressed no matter their race, creed, religion, or orientation. There are basic human rights that EVERYONE should have love, safety, and peace. Life isn’t always fair, but each individual can contribute what they can to helping establish safe zones. If you want a real-life example of one of my favorite heroes of this time period, check out Corrie Ten Boom, this is the woman I want to be should I ever be faced with a situation like the people during this time were.

12- Visit the Via Dolorosa

Via Delerosa

The Via Dolorosa is said to be the road that Jesus walked on his way to the Cross. The alleyways are quite small, and the apartments lining them are getting taller and taller; this adds to the sense of stifling chaos on the streets. Making our way up the alleyway, there are small churches that signify important points on that final journey to the cross.

There are fourteen stations along this path, each station represents a specific event on the day of the Crucifixion.

  • Station One: Jesus was condemned
  • Station Two: Jesus received his cross
  • Station Three: Jesus falls from the weight of the cross for the first time
  • Station Four: Jesus meets his mother Mary
  • Station Five: Simon helps Jesus carry his cross
  • Station Six: Veronica wipes the face of Jesus
  • Station Seven: Jesus falls the second time
  • Station Eight: Jesus speaks to the women of Jerusalem
  • Station Nine: Jesus falls the third time
  • Station Ten: Jesus is Stripped of his garments
  • Station Eleven: Jesus is nailed to the cross
  • Station Twelve: Jesus dies on the cross
  • Station Thirteen: Jesus is taken down from the cross
  • Station Fourteen: Jesus is laid in the tomb

While we weren’t able to stop at each station due to time constraints, it is a path I would like to go back and visit— taking the time to stop at each station and contemplate what he went through. There is a lot that can be learned from what he went through.

If you decide you would like to take a tour of the Via Dolorosa, then I would suggest taking an official tour of the path. This will get you access to guides that have more than 2 years of education on these sites and will be able to get you access into the chapels that mark each of these moments. A very popular way of experiencing this is to carry a medium wooden cross with your friends in the heat, up the alleyways and to each stop. If you see wooden crosses being carried by such people, be respectful and allow them to worship in the way they feel is best.

Via Dolorosa

I am not much for large displays of devotion, but seeing the example of their devotion to the experience really truly humbled me. In a way, it felt that I wasn’t doing enough in my daily life to be grateful for what I personally feel to be true.

13- Visit the Garden of Gethsemane

Garden of Gesthemene

For this visit, I highly recommend you go first thing in the morning – rain or shine. It will give you time to enjoy the beautiful garden in peace. Take your scriptures with you, sit and contemplate what happened here. Read the passages that are pertinent to this place and let the weight of it sink into your soul.

I went with a tour group and we sat in a moment of silence, letting the moment really sink in as to where we were standing. We read a few scriptures and then sang a few songs reverently. Being surrounded by Olive Trees that are more than 2,000 years old, is an experience in and of itself — but to have a spiritual component to it made the time there even more impactful for me personally.

Garden of Gesthemene

We arrived 15-minutes before the opening time and were able to sit in the space for at least 20-minutes nearly alone before other travelers started to trickle into the garden. Visiting hours for the garden are: Daily from 8:30 am to 12:00 pm and 2:30 to 5:00 pm
Sunday and Thursday the Garden of Gethsemane closes at 4:00 pm

14- Visit The Jerusalem Archaeological Park – Davidson Center

This place is fascinating solely because of the history behind it. The views are not the prettiest in this section of the Temple Mount, but the archaeological finds are the best part. The large rubble that you see is that from the first and second temple periods after it was destroyed by the Romans and has lain ever since.

The Jerusalem Archeological Park

You will see the intact ancient city wall, and the Temple’s staircase, a preserved ancient street, some ritual immersion baths, and storerooms. This was the main thoroughfare, where pilgrims would visit, pay for their sacrificial coin to give to the temple sages and Rabbis. They would stop at the stalls before entering the temple; bring either grain, birds, animals etc… then are given a coin imprinted with what they exchanged. The coin would then be stowed away while they completed their ritual baths before entering the temple. They would then walk up this staircase (see photo below) and enter the Temple Mount to receive religious blessings and spiritual insights from the Rabbis for their daily lives.

Jerusalem Archaeological Park

If you look closely at the rest of the grounds, you will see Robinson’s Arch, the Herodian Street, the Dung Gate, and the Western Wall. If you enter the Robinson’s Center you can explore interactive Maps and 3D images of what the area would have looked like then vs now.
The Center follows events that spanned more than 5000 years of activity all in one location. You will become a witness to what the Canaanite (Bronze) Age looked like, up until the Israelite monarchy in the First Temple period.

Jerusalem Archaeological Park

Visitors to the Park follow events spanning some 5000 years, beginning with the Canaanite (Bronze) Age and continuing through the days of the Israelite monarchy in the First Temple period.
This place does get quite crowded with visitors, so be sure to visit the Robinson Center earlier in the day, or maybe on a day when the Western Wall and Temple Mount are closed.

15- Visit the Pool of Siloam

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There are two areas that are called the Pool of Siloam, one is the traditional spot, and one is the archaeological spot.

The true pool was built around 400 AD by the Empress Eudocia. The archaeological pool was found when two stone steps were excavated and revealed a pool from the Second Temple period, from the time of Jesus Christ. The pool that was discovered was 225 feet long, thought to be in a trapezoidal shape. The waters that feed this pool is from a spring from the Gihon Spring flowing from the Kidron Valley. It is considered a naturally flowing spring and would have been used as a ritual bathing pool. How did engineering feat happen so long ago?

Pool of Sialom
Courtesy of AppleMark

After further archaeological investigation, it appears that Hezekiah (the King of Judah during the 8th Century BC) built this to protect the cities water supply during a siege. A 1,750-foot tunnel under the City was built to bring water in from the Gihon Spring. You can take tours of this tunnel by reserving your tour beforehand.
In many Christian faith’s, this pool has profound significance, as it is considered to be the pool where Jesus Christ healed the blind man.

16- Eat Kebab and Falafel

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These are classic dishes for everyone to try when visiting this ancient city.  The spices within this city are incredibly flavorful, with a savory nutty undertone. These are not spicy but would recommend you get some water.
For the Kebab it is a mix of minced lamb with salt, pepper, parsley, and onions. It is then grilled and stuffed into a pita with a Salad. The Salad is a mix of greens, cucumber, tomato, and raw tahini sauce…..are you drooling yet? I am…. These are often served with a dish of freshly made seasoned Hummus.

Fresh and healthy falafel with tzatziki tomato red onion and iceberg lettuce in pita bread

For the Falafel, it is chickpeas ground up and filled with spices like coriander and a generous dose of cumin. Then you press these into patties, or roll them into small balls of goodness and fry them up. They are typically served in a wrap or a pita with tomatoes and lettuce. Sometimes you will get Turkish-inspired fried eggplant, tabouli salad, Balela Salad, and Roasted Garlic Hummus.

The Best Kebab is from Shaheen Kebab located at Shuk Hakatsavim 76Jerusalem, Israel
The Best Falafel is from Moshiko Falafel located at Ben Yehuda StreetJerusalem, Israel

17- Visit the Church of St Anne

This is one of the best-preserved Crusader churches in Jerusalem, and also happens to be the site of Jesus’ maternal grandparents. Why is this important? It also means it is the birthplace of the Virgin Mary, a figure worshiped by many religions the world over.

Church of St Anne

This quaint church is surrounded by trees, shrubs and beautiful flowers eliciting a sensation of peace and tranquility due to the foliage blocking out much of the business within the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem.
As you head into the church, you may see a large excavation area on the left, believed to be the Pool of Bethesda, where Christ healed the sick man.

The church itself, dates back to around 450 AD, as a site dedicated to where the Virgin Mary was born. The church is quaint, but still has the fortress-like appearance characteristic of many Crusader churches.
As you enter the large gray building, you will notice a quiet reverence within. Then a group will stand in the front and sing hymnals in a strategically measured way to present the incredible acoustics that is naturally produced within these walls.

Music always has a way of bringing up spiritual feelings for me, even more than any sermon that could be given. I honestly could have stayed here for an hour or two, letting the voices of the earthly angels drive the feeling of peace into my soul.

18- Visit the Church of Mary Magdalene

You can’t exactly enter this church as it is cared for by 30 Russian Orthodox nuns, from several different countries. Some say that if you are very nice, and ring the front bell, they may show you around (worth a shot if you have the time). They are known for their liturgical singing, and also paint icons, embroider vestments liturgical use, and decorate Russian eggs.
The church was built by Czar Alexander III of Russian in 1888 in memory of his mother, whose patron saint was Mary Magdalene. The Onion tops look like the architecture of the 16th-17th century, and the facade is not marble, it is in fact….white sandstone! If you do not know, any rain on sandstone repeatedly will quickly wear it down and disintegrate the facade quite quickly if not properly cared for. It is quite stunning to witness such a fragile masterpiece though.

Church of Mary Magdalene
Church of Mary Magdalene

I would recommend this as your last stop though, particularly at night as the iconic onion-shaped golden domes break through the surrounding skyline of trees and are flooded with light. It is truly a photographers dream to see such a play of light and dark.
If you go just outside of the Mount of Olives, you may be able to get a good view; or visit the Tomb of the Virgin and get both photos as a keepsake about the mother of Jesus.

19- Go to the local Markets

Local Markets in Jerusalem

You cannot come to such an ancient city, fraught with contrasting division and unity and not support the locals. The interactions you have with the locals at these shops might be some of the only exposure they get to foreigners visiting their country, so why not put forward your best face 🙂

Take a day and commit to a buying one or two items from someone that you can sit and have a candid conversation about them, their life, how it is living in Jerusalem, what are their daily struggles, ask about their families, how the family units are run etc…. You may be pleasantly surprised by what you learn. Just keep in mind, that just because a people, culture, religion, or economic structure is different than what you may be used to, does NOT mean that it is inherently wrong. In short: Be open-minded, be kind, have the courage to ask the hard questions in a way that is respectful to them and their beliefs. These are the conversations that I hold the dearest to my heart. It connects you to the culture, fosters good impressions and will help change opinions one person at a time. Like with any business, word of mouth is a powerful tool, so don’t think for an instant your efforts are wasted.

Local Markets in Jerusalem
Mountain of Zatar Spice

Here are some of the best markets to visit in Jerusalem:

  • Mahane Yehuda Market (The Shuk or Machne in local terms)
    • Anthony Bourdain visited here during one of his visits, there are craft beers and barrels of spices for the choosing. It is quite popular with the tourists, so come early!
    • Location: Ha-Shazif Street, Jerusalem, Israel
    • Hours: Typically open 8am-7pm Sunday through Thursday. Limited hours on Friday. (double check on opening times as they are subject to change)
  • Bezalel Arts Fair
    • This is an arts and crafts fair with a more relaxed ambiance. There are crafty pieces made by locals, cosmetics, jewelry for every price range, and is far less frantic than other markets.
    • Location: Rehov Bezalel, Jerusalem, Israel
    • Hours: Typically open Fridays 10am-4pm (double check on opening times as they are subject to change)
  • The Farmers’ and Artistic’ Market in the Germany Colony
    • This is one of the more beautiful areas of Jerusalem and holds a large variety of cheese, hand puppets, crafts, and a variety of other treasures. The items you find in this market are going to largely be handmade by those who live in Jerusalem – so authenticity and quality are the norms not the exception in this market (the perfect place for that unique gift).
    • Location: Emek Refa’im Street, Jerusalem, Israel
    • Hours: Typically open Friday 9am-3pm (double check on opening times as they are subject to change)
  • The Old City Souk
    • This is known for its textiles and trinket souvenirs. This is also a very crowded area as it is so close to all those areas within the old city, which means many of the tourists come here for the convenience of the location. So it just depends on if you are ok braving the narrow streets and hoards of tourists.
    • Location: Shuk ha-Tsaba’im Street, Jerusalem, Israel
    • Hours: Mon-Sun 9am-6pm (double check on opening times as they are subject to change)

20 – Visit the Cardo of Jerusalem

This was a very captivating part of the old city for me. Imagine you are walking through the bustling streets of the Jewish Quarter in Jerusalem, in a very modern part of the city, with perfectly manicured garden balconies in Granite appearing apartments. Then you take a right turn and descend into a massive pit with Roman columns and an alleyway that is hidden in the shadows underneath the bustling modern streets above.

This is the Cardo, a spectacular stone column-lined street that was just like those of the ancient Roman times. The Cardo in Jerusalem starts at the Damascus Gate and runs south underneath the Old City and ends at the Zion Gate. The Northern side is more Roman, the Southern side is from more of the Byzantine empire.

As you make your way into the shadows, there is a fantastic mural depicting what life would be like back in the time of Jesus along a Cardo like the one you are standing in. Be sure to pick out the modern male child being given a gift by an anciently garbed young girl. This mural could not be more perfect in the depiction of this area where old meets new and melds together to sustain the memories of the past.

Take a stroll into the Cardo, walk along it like any ancient Jerusalemite in the 6th century. As you make your way past the shops, you will enter an area that used to be the Crusader’s Bazaar, built around the 12th century, and then renovated to let stores sell their more modern trinkets.
THIS is the place to go on a hot day honestly. There is a nice breeze down the Cardo, and the sun is not grating you, nor is the reflective heat off of the stones and pavement reflecting back up off the surfaces as it is on the streets above.

  • SUN-THURS: 9 AM – 7 PM (SUMMER); 9 AM – 5 PM (WINTER); FRI: 9 AM – 1 PM (Please double check on opening times, as they are subject to change depending on the climate, and political situations)

21- Visit the Basilica of Our Lord in Agony

This is one of the most beautiful churches I have had the privilege of entering in my entire life. I couldn’t quite hear what my guide was saying about this church, as it is required to be as quiet as you can within this building. This is the traditional site of where they believe Jesus left his disciples and went to pray to the Lord, suffering the agony of the world while he did it.

The windows are made from a purplish-blue alabaster, that creates a dimmed-lighting effect to the inside of the church. Six monolithic columns support 12 cupolas, the insides of which are decorated with mosaic tiles depicting the national emblems of the communities that donated to make this church possible (this is also the reason it is nicknamed the ‘church of all nations’).

As you look up at the ceiling in the dimmed lighting, small gold stars surrounding the mosaic of Jesus will greet you. Giving an impression of what it was like the night that Jesus came here to suffer for the sins of all nations. Gesthemene is actually a Greek word meaning ‘Olive Press’, which is essentially what many Christians believed he endured; the weight of the world’s sins pressed the blood from every pore.

Just be warned that this church is also crowded during the day with tourists, even when we arrived early in the morning. Be sure to arrive either right at opening time (maybe a little before), or give yourself an hour before closing time to allow those quiet moments of contemplation. It is worth the effort to feel slightly uncomfortable in the crowds honestly, and I detest tourist traps with a passion…..but this was worth the effort to me.

22- Visit the Museum of Islamic Art

Islam forbids the worship of images, and especially those depicting the Prophet Mohammad. This is why when you see an Islamic Mosque or Art, many times it is the artistry in the words and the way they are spoken that they express their form of worship. After centuries of perfecting their craft, many collections have been gathered into this museum. There is a collection of not just Islamic Art, but also artifacts and archaeological finds that have been discovered throughout the Holy Land.

What is even more fascinating is that the Museum was founded and opened by a member of the Jewish community. Vera Salomons herself was the epitome of religious tolerance and was interested in building bridges of understanding between Palestinians and Jews in Jerusalem. I am completely inspired by her dedication to truly making an enormous effort in trying to make changes in a region fraught with misunderstanding and distrust.
Here you will gain a better understanding of what you are seeing when you look at the writings, the colorful images, and what they mean to the Islamic religion and culture. If you would like to understand a conflict in its entirety, first you must understand the point of view from both eyes.

23- Walk the Inner and Outer walls of the city

I know this sounds like a bit much, but a gentleman in our group took a run around part of these walls every day. If you don’t want to run, just take a short walk in the mornings so you can get the layout of the city. See what local people do in the mornings and the evenings, and really feel the beat of this city before the chaos of tourists ensues.

He went on a run twice a day and said that in the evenings the walls are all lit up around the city – giving it a fantastic view of the ancient structures. In the mornings, he reported that a mist would come in on parts of the city and give it a heavenly feel as locals rushed about getting errands done. Traffic is also significantly lower in the mornings as well, which is much kinder to your lungs.

I was personally traveling solo, and get lost VERY easy, so I get too nervous to do this type of thing alone in a large city. Smaller cities I like to take a morning walk, or if I have my GPS and a full phone battery then I love to explore.

24- Visit the Chapel of the Ascension

This is a Crusader Chapel, that is said to be built over the footprint of Jesus before he ascended to Heaven after his resurrection. It is a simple octagon structure over a stone said to hold the imprint of Jesus Christ. Many Christians visit this Chapel, light candles, sing songs, read passages in their scriptures, and cherish the last spot that Jesus Christ was said to have been before leaving the Earth.

It is located on the East side of the main road leading up to the Mount of Olives. There is a Russian Orthodox Church nearby also called the Chapel of Ascension that is another traditionally held site where worshipers believe Christ ascended to Heaven.

25 – Visit the Gates of Jerusalem (Jaffa, Damascus, Dung, Zion, New Gate, Golden Gate)

All of these gates had significance in not only the ancient world but some even in the more modern history. With the city constantly under attack, entrenched in war or conflict between religious factions City walls, fortifications, and gates were essential to daily life and keeping the city safe. Here is some history of each of these gates, and why they are an important part of your visit to Jerusalem.

Gates of Jerusalem
Gates of Jerusalem
  • Jaffa Gate: 
    • This gate is on the Western side of the city and it was used as the main entrance from the old city into the Temple Mount. It also faced towards the ancient city of Jaffa.
    • The gate was first constructed in the Hasmonean period when this portion of the city had no natural defenses. Then in 37 BC, Herod the Great built three large towers, one of which still stands and is known as David’s Tower.
    •  In 1948 the War of Independence ensued and the Israeli forces attempted to enter the city through this gate. If you look around the edges of the entrance you can still see large, deep bullet holes around the gate. Looking at these bullet holes gave me chills. I always hear about wars on the television, but seeing the scars on this gate that were bigger than my head made me realize just how intense the fighting here must have been. It made me grateful to live in the country I do.
    • A road was eventually built here on the south side of the gate and is still used today as the major  entry point for vehicles into the old city
  • Damascus Gate: 
    • On the North Western Side of the city walls. This was the main entrance into the city in the time of Agrippa (ruler during the 1st century BCE). As time passed and the city grew with the Roman Rule, the gate was significantly enlarged with three arched openings. These gates led into a Roman-like courtyard (according to excavations) and a large statue of Emperor Hadrian was said to greet (and intimidate) travelers into the city. Two streets started from this courtyard, leading southward during that time; but still, function as the main thoroughfare today. The statue of Hadrian is now gone, but the surviving streets are now known as Khan A- Zeit (to the right) or Beit Habad street (to the left) and lead into the Muslim Quarter of the Old City.
    • The Damascus Gate is also the gate that is nearest to the two most important Biblical sites in Jerusalem: Golgotha, just across the street, and Jesus’ Tomb, which is 90 meters away.
    • Travel Tip: Prices here are cheaper than other parts of the city, many people will tell you not to venture over here just for the lower prices, but tourists still go and are just fine. You will see Israeli soldiers stationed here, and in the past, some have been stabbed and shot in recent years so be aware of your surroundings, wear appropriate clothing, be respectful and you should be fine. 
  • Zion Gate: 
    • On the South West Side and is also known as the Gate of the Prophet of Davide, because of David’s tomb on Mt Zion. This is near the Jewish and Armenian Quarters of the Old City.
  • New Gate: 
    • Also on the Western Side of the City, this gate was once a wall built by the Ottoman Empire in 1540. It was 350 years later that this ‘New Gate’ was built into the wall to allow for easier access into the Christian Quarter from the outlying monasteries.
  • Golden Gate: 
    • This is a sealed gate on the eastern side of the city and was built around 640 A.D.  by the last of the Byzantine rulers. It is also known as the Gate of Mercy because according to Jewish tradition, the Messiah will enter Jerusalem through this gate. The gate is now sealed, as the Muslim people during the time of Suleiman wanted to prevent this.
  • Herod’s Gate
    • On the North Side of the city, and was the gate that led to Herod’s Palace – because why wouldn’t a man named Herod the Great have his own entrance. It is also known as the Flower Gate because of the flowers that adorn the stone surrounding the entrance. This gate leads into the Muslim quarter on the Northern Wall.
  • Dung Gate: 
    • This gate is located on near the Western wall. There are different theories for the naming of this gate, one which when trash was cleared out of the city through this gate.  It is also known to some as the Gate of the Moors due to North African immigrants living near the gate in the 16th century.

In Summary: 

No matter what street you take, what building you enter in this ancient city — you will find some historical or religious facts that will strike you at the very core. You can visit this city if you are Christian, Atheist, Muslim, Jewish, an archeologist, or historical fan and leave feeling moved. The best advice I could give anyone in visiting this city, keep an open mind and especially an open heart. Have conversations with the locals, ask about their lives, discover the modern and ancient history melding together in a beautiful story that continues to be told and created even today.

As Always….Happy Travels, Happy Tales, and See YOU on the Flip Side 😉


Tours Available in Jerusalem:

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Where to Stay in Jerusalem:

At Glows in the Center of the Old City
Chain Gate Hostel, Right Near the Temple Mount
A Cave Apartment about 1 mile from Jaffe Gate
New Imperial Hotel right next to David’s Tower
Other Accommodations in Jerusalem
Other Accommodations in Tel Aviv

How to Get Around in Jerusalem:

How to Use the Buses and Light rails in Jerusalem
ITravel Jerusalem City Pass

Safety in Jerusalem:

I was with a tour group while there and felt completely safe in Israel. This was about 2 months before a skirmish broke out between Gaza and Israel. There is a lot of sensationalism in the media about this country, but just keep your ears and eyes open. Avoid the Old City on Fridays as this is typically when the two religions are there praying at the same time and there are clashes between the two on occasion.
Safety in the Old City
Trip Advisor Forum on Safety in the Old City
US Consulate in Israel 

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The tragic history of love, courage, and loss: Masada

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detailed replica of Masada[/caption] Masada is located on top of an isolated cliff in the Judean desert where it overlooks the Dead Sea. It’s a popular place for tourists from Israel to visit because it is such an integral part of the Jewish history. [caption id="attachment_5072" align="alignnone" width="4000"]Dead Sea view from the top of Masada View of the Dead Sea from Masada[/caption]

How to get there: The 421 bus travels from Tel-Aviv Arlozorov Terminal every day at 9 am and arrives at 11:47am. Returning, it departs Maddalena at 16:13 and reaches Tel-Aviv at 19:08. They don’t allow you on the bus if you have gone swimming in the dead sea due to mud making the seats wet and dirty. They do have showers at the Dead Sea, but I don’t think shampoo or soap is allowed.
The cost for a taxi all day, including a visit to Masada and the Dead Sea, will probably run you around 1200-1500 shekels including waiting time, round-trip, for two people. Locals actually suggest renting a car for one day and enjoying your time at these two places. It would be cheaper than using a taxi and what if you miss the bus? You could do a tour out here, but it’s quite expensive.
Traveler tip: Masada can get extremely hot at the top. We were there in April and had to take several breaks around the top to cool down, get water, and find shade. We were warned several times not to try and hike to the top, via the stairs. They told us about a German tourist who had won several marathons and was built “like a rock”– she ended up getting heat stroke when she reached the top and had to visit the hospital afterwards. Granted, she did run up the stairs, but my advice: be smart, don’t be stupid.
[gallery ids="5038,5041,5040,5037" type="square" columns="2"] The History: The only history of Masada that we know of is from Josephus Flavius’s writings titled, “The Jewish War”; interestingly enough, he was actually born Joseph ben Matityahu. Matityahu is a Jewish name, so why would he change his name to Flavius, which is a distinctly Roman name? It was after he was appointed Governor of Galilee when he led the Jewish Rebellion in 66 CE. [gallery ids="5061,5059" type="rectangular"] Masada was built between 37 and 31 BCE by Herod the Great, who was King of Judea and wanted a refuge for himself. This fortress was built with storehouses and large cisterns that have an amazing engineering feature of utilizing and storing rainwater in gigantic cisterns that still work today. The fortress also included rainwater, barracks, palaces, and an armory. [gallery ids="5071,5069,5065" type="rectangular"] Herod the Great died (likely from Chronic Kidney Disease), and 75 years later the Jewish Rebels, part of the Great Jewish Revolt, took over the Masada fortress. The Jewish Zealot refugees joined them there, and it was their stronghold for the next three years while they continued to harass the local and surrounding Romans. Then in 73 CE, the Romans decided they had enough. Roman governor Flavius Silva marched against Masada with the Tenth Legion. They didn’t just bring the Tenth legion though, they also brought thousands of Jewish Prisoners of War, for the sole purpose of killing their own people or dying themselves. You can see that on the west side of the park there are still remnants of the enormous ramp built by hand, and the Roman encampments that had were also erected. [gallery ids="5049,5062,5051" type="rectangular"] This ramp is what lead to the tragic loss of lives within Masada. The leader of the Jewish inhabitants decided that instead of being captured by the Romans, then brutally tortured and tossed in the Gladiator games, suicide would be a better choice. [gallery ids="5063,5053" type="rectangular"] The Jewish Zealots literally gathered straws, the 10 with the shortest straws killed everyone else. Then the last 2 survivors killed the rest and then killed each other. That night, 1,000 men, women, and children died. The next morning, they were found by the Roman legion. I couldn’t believe that their situation would drive so many to death. It really broke my heart and made me think of how terrible it must have been. I imagined myself looking at a sure fate worse than death; to be captured by the Roman soldiers who were know to rape, beat, and torture for sport at the gate, then looking into my sister or child’s eyes and knowing they would face even worse, and having to make a choice to end their life. Having to possess the courage to end your child’s life, someone who trusts you implicitly to not hurt them, and knowing that when you completed the act, they wouldn’t understand. How could you do it? How could you be driven to that place where doing that would be better than being captured? It made me cry, literally, right there, because of both the terror and the courage these people must have felt to have to do this. It is likely the most humbling place I have been to date. The pain was still palpable. I don’t know that I will ever return, and even writing about this has been difficult. I am very passionate about history and remembering it though so that we don’t repeat it.
To read more about Israel and its history, check out these other articles: The space between Israeli’s and Palestinians Capernaum, Church of Primacy of Peter, Bet Shean: My Pilgrimage through Israel Jaffa, Cesarea, Mount Carmel : My pilgrimage through Israel Journey through Jezreel Valley, Nazareth, and Mt Tebor: My pilgrimage through Israel
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The Space Between Israel and Palestine, a Fragile Peace

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A boy flying a Palestinian flag near Jewish Settlements[/caption] Despite Palestinian’s being supported by forces of Syria, Egypt etc… By 1949 Israel forces controlled 70% of the land of Palestine & had pushed well past their borders established in the U.N. plan of 1947. When the 750,000 Palestinians who fled due to fighting tried to return to the now Israeli State, they were permanently barred by the Israeli government. The descendants of those refugees number around 7 million. Given the tensions, and the recent Genocide, I can see their point of view of wanting to be overly protective of their people. I also see the Palestinian view of frustration, because no matter where you are in this world, home is still home, and never being able to return would be very heart breaking. To this day there are millions of Palestinian refugees that have a very hard time finding decent jobs & many more still living in refugee camps in the Gaza strip, west bank, Lebanon and Jordan. The Jewish people needed a refuge from the storm of World War II & a safe place to be able to heal; but in giving them that, a large number of Palestinian refugees was created. [caption id="attachment_3693" align="alignnone" width="4608"]Between Israel and Palestine Jewish Men praying at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem[/caption] As the Israeli state became more established, there was segregation, there were rights denied to Palestinians who had stayed — including privileged housing that is and was denied to them, but allowed for the Jewish people. This gave rise to the 6 day war, where Israel was able to seize the Golan Heights from Syria, the West Bank from Jordan, and the Sinai & Gaza strip from Egypt’s control; the Israeli State now controlled all of Israel, including the Holy Sites within Jerusalem. Israel now was able to govern those Palestinians that they had fought for decades. Then in 1978, Egypt and Israel signed the Camp David Accords, and gave the Siani Peninsula back to Egypt. This was very controversial to many Arab states, but over time the other Arab states were able to come to peace with Israel even if they never formally signed a peace deal. [gallery ids="4187,4188" type="rectangular"] The Gaza Strip and the West Bank were intended to be areas where Palestinians were allowed to live and raise their families. When I visited Israel, it seemed that the Palestinians were boxed in with barbed wire and from friends I have living there, the living conditions are not good at all. There is rationing of power, water, infrastructure and resources. While on the Israel side, the Jewish people have managed to turn it into a thriving Metropolis that attracts thousands of visitors and tourists every year. The Palestinians were not happy with the Israeli rule, and the Israeli & Palestinian conflict ensued. The Palestinians began to fight back, including with acts of terrorism; backpack bombs, bombs in Maternity wards and buses– none of this was going to help with peace talks for either side. The Palestinians who were struggling against Israel wanted to end the Israeli occupation entirely. The fighting was very brutal, at one point Israel actually began to invade Lebanon (1982). [caption id="attachment_4246" align="alignnone" width="3000"]Between Israel and Palestine Police fences were randomly placed throughout the city in Jerusalem for precaution[/caption] Unfortunately, the State of Israel, has started putting Jewish settlements inside the Gaza strip, they partition those areas off, and when the Palestinians complain, they are hushed quietly but also forcefully at times (according to reports). Because they are backed by the Israeli army, they have allowed them to come into Palestinian sections and destroyed hundreds of homes, orchards and agricultural lands. If there is resistance by the Palestinians, they are punished with raids, arrests and assassinations. Some assume that this is an attempt to make life so hard for the Palestinians that they will be too afraid to resist, or they will just leave. Why would the Jewish people want to live in these areas at all? Some chose to move to these settlements for religious reasons, some for political reasons, and some… just because the housing was so much cheaper than the housing near all the Holy sites throughout Israel. Between Israel and Palestine By placing these settlements within the Palestinian occupied lands, it will make it much harder for the Palestinians to ever have a Palestinian state. Currently the settlers have been numbered above 700,000. In 1987-1999 was the first Intifada, or the first Palestinian uprising; the Israeli’s lost several hundred and the Palestinians over 1,000. About this same time that this was happening in the West Bank, Gaza created its own army called Hamas; a group of violent extremists that felt they were defending their ‘state’. By 1993 it was clear from the destruction and devastation on both sides, that a peace deal would need to be made. This is when the Oslo Accords was signed by leaders on both sides. This accord was suppose to be the first step in Israel withdrawing from Palestinian lands, and potentially allowing a Palestinian state. This was when the Palestinian authority was established and allowed Palestinians a little bit of authority to govern themselves in certain areas. Members of Hamas launched a series of bombings to try and sabotage the process. Because of this, the Israeli’s began to protest the peace talks, and called the Israeli Prime Minister of the time Hitler and a Nazi. After the 2nd round of the Oslo Accords was signed, the Prime Minister was then shot to death by a far right Israeli in Tel Aviv. [caption id="attachment_4184" align="alignnone" width="4000"]Between Israel and Palestine An Israeli flag flight near the traditional site where Jesus Christ was believed to be Baptized[/caption] By 2000-2005 with the failure of Camp David II summit, Palestinians began to give up hope for peace. The Palestinians rose up with the Second Intafada or uprising, and this one ended up being MUCH more violent than the first Intafada. This conflict produced 1,000 Israeli deaths, and 3,200 Palestinian deaths. This uprising change the tone of the conflict for Israeli’s, they became much more doubtful and skeptical that the Palestinians actually wanted peace, and not just their total destruction. This is when all the walls, checkpoints, and increased Israeli military presence came into Israel to not make peace, but manage the violence and protect its Jewish citizens. [caption id="attachment_4185" align="alignnone" width="4000"]IMG_3345 Barbed wire along the road to the Jordan River, where Jesus Christ was believed to be Baptized[/caption] This left the Palestinians feeling that peace will never come, and are feeling the growth of an ever increasing Israeli occupation through the settlements. Israel ends up withdrawing from Gaza, Hamas then gains power, ends up splitting from the Palestinian authority rule in a short Civil war. This is when Israel places the Gaza strip under a massive & suffocating isolation, because of all the violence originating from the Gaza strip. Unemployment in the Gaza Strip rises up to 40%, and living conditions have deteriorated even further with nearly 1.8 million Palestinians living within a 25 mile by 7 mile wide area, and an estimated 1.1 million Palestinian refugees between the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. [caption id="attachment_4216" align="aligncenter" width="704"]Between Israel and Palestine The Area of the Gaza Strip Compared to Los Angeles in the United States[/caption] In the West Bank the Israeli government is still putting up settlements, and the Palestinians are getting increasingly frustrated by this… which then leads to violence and riots. Because of the continued and long history of war, and violence, most Israeli’s have become apathetic to the situation; and the government manages the conflict to the point that most Israeli’s don’t know about it. There are brief periods when the violent groups will rise up, and the deaths that occur from this violence are largely Palestinian (due to US backing of the Israeli Army). So as you can see, on both sides, there are extremists that use Violence to derail peace. It is a thin line that both leaders must walk in order to make peace talks both happen and take effect without risking their own lives & keep the area relatively stable. Until BOTH sides are able to be at peace, and not seek for the opposing sides total destruction… peace will not happen, only relative stability. [caption id="attachment_4194" align="aligncenter" width="488"]Between Israel and Palestine A flag and Menorah are proudly displayed atop an Israeli buidling[/caption] The Israeli occupation on Palestinian lands (according previous accords signed), cannot peacefully last much longer. Whatever we see come next will be much worse, it is a struggle on both sides of each one wanting the other’s destruction. I don’t know what the right answer is, and I have friends on both sides of this conflict. I have to be careful of what I call the land there. If I’m talking to my Jewish friends, it is ‘Israel’; if I’m talking to my Palestinian friends, then its ‘Israeli occupied Palestine’. [caption id="attachment_4197" align="aligncenter" width="679"]Between Israel and Palestine Dome of the Rock in Israel a Sacred site to Muslims[/caption] Now I feel I have a better understanding of why there is a need for the barricades, barbed wire etc…. on both sides. All in all, it just makes me sad. Its not just about religion, its about both sides wanting to protect their lands, people, and children. I do not personally feel the US should solely be involved in this, especially if they have something to gain through some export from Israel. I don’t really want to get into that political portion of this conflict. All I can do is listen to both sides, encourage peace, pray for it & try not to ruffle anyone’s feathers by talking about my opinions on the matter. Don’t let this conflict discourage you from visiting Israel though, it really is incredible to be a witness to thousands of years of history & see for yourself what Israel is today. Much love to both sides, and may God bring you both peace in this time of heartache and turmoil. [gallery ids="4207,4208,4209,4210,4200,4198" type="slideshow"]


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Capernaum, Church of Primacy of Peter, Bet Shean: My Pilgrimage through Israel

Reading Time: 9 minutes
Capernaum (Kfar Nahum) was established in 2nd century BC, it was strategically located on the main trade route between Damascus and Egypt. It was here where the Roman toll booth’s were, on the road or near the harbor that they collected taxes on your goods as you would go from one town to another. In the time that Jesus lived here, there were approximately 2,000-4,000 inhabitants of mostly fisherman, farmers, and merchants comprised of mostly conservative, devout Jews. [gallery ids="1404,1408,1409,1410,1411,1412" type="rectangular"] There is very little Archaeological evidence to support that Gentiles lived in this town at that time. In Bethsaida there is much more archeological evidence that Romans and Gentile influence, a Roman garrison was actually stationed nearby. A Roman centurion actually paid for the synagogue built for the Jewish community. Peter’s house was actually in this same area, and over the years several worship houses were built on top of this, but virtually all were destroyed in the earthquake of 747 A.D. Peter’s house was not rediscovered again until the late 1800’s. The Franciscans acquired the ruins in 1894, and ultimately built a monastery and church over the site of Peter’s house. Peter’s house was actually pretty significant in Christianity, due to the fact that Peter’s house is commonly where Jesus would stay while he was in Capernaum as he did not hold or own a home of his own. Actually most of the miracles & hearings happened in Peter’s house, or rather Peter’s mother-in-law’s house (since it was tradition for people when they are married to live with their parents). [gallery ids="1405,1407,1406" type="square"] Capernaum was a small Jewish community, so there was no need for reading and writing. This likely means that Peter was illiterate. Now think about what Jesus tells him, ‘through small and weak or humble things that the Lord can make them strong’.  Interestingly enough, Matthew the Publican (or Tax collector is from Capernaum). If you were to come into Capernaum the first thing that you would notice is the smell, it was a fishing village. There were fish that were dead or dying, women smoking the fish, children running in and out of the water, men mending nets and casting nets — so in essence it takes a village to catch enough fish to sustain it and its occupants. The fishing boats were usually out all day long, and Capernaum would have been a chaotic and active with this work. The houses were usually covered with boughs of palm leaves and mud for a type of stucco. (Remember this for when you read the story of the men breaking the roof to lower a man into it). Lunch was in a little café by the side of the Sea of Galilee, where we had fish that was caught just like it would have been in Jesus time. It was a little hard for me to see the fish’s head and eat it and peel the skin off myself, but it was good because I was so hungry anyway. [gallery ids="1414,1415,1416" type="rectangular"] It was in Capernaum that Peter, James and John are asked to be fishers of men, where he teaches at the synagogue. There were many miracles that occurred here, so much so that you could call it “The City of Miracles” here is a list of Miracles that occurred in the town itself with corresponding scriptures.

Healing of Nobleman’s son (John 4:46-54), Calling of Andrew, Peter, James and John, miracle of catching fish (Matt 4:13-22; Luke 5:1-11), Savior’s family comes to visit (John 2:12), Teaching in the synagogue (Mark 1:21), Casting out unclean spirit (synagogue)(Luke 4:31-37), Healing Peter’s mother-in-law (right after casting out an unclean spirit)(Matt 8:14-17; Mark 1:29-31), Healing all manner of people (in Peter’s house, right after healing his mother-in-law)(Mark 1:32-34); Forgiving and healing of Paralytic (in Peter’s house?)(Mark 2:1-13; Matt 9); Calling of Matthew (Mark 2:14-17; Matt 9); Eats with publican (Matthew), Pharisees question him (Mark 2:16-22); Eats corn from fields nearby on Sabbath (Probably near Capernaum)(Mark 2:23-28; Luke 6:1-5); Heal’s a withered man’s hand (in synagogue)(prob Capernaum)(Mark 3:1-6; Luke 6:6-11); Taught by the sea side (Mark 3:7-9); Questions of fasting (Luke 5:33-39; Matt 9), Healing of Centurion’s Servant (Luke 7:1-10); Raising of Jairus daughter (who also happened to be a leader of a synagoge)(Matt 9:18-26; Mark 5:21-43); healing of two blind men (Matt 9); Casting out devils from a possessed and dumb man (Matt 9); Bread of Life Sermon (synagogue)(John 6:22-71); Paying trubute/catching fish with money in its mouth (Matt 17:24-27); Question about who is the greatest among the Apostles (Mark 9:33-37); Heading towards Capernaum when Savior walks on water (John 6:17-21); ?Healing of demonic boy? (Mark 9:14-27); ?Sending forth of teh 12? (Matt 10)
But I think my personal favorite was when Professor Brent L Top told us the historical significance behind healing the woman with the ‘issue of blood’ (Mark 5:25-34). The issue of blood was actually a term in that time that referred to Menorrhagia, and in this instance was from the time she was in puberty until now. Under the Law of Moses, a woman is ‘unclean during menstruation’– this means that she could not worship in the synagogue, she could marry or have children, be a wife, an have posterity…..but she can’t. People are thronging in the narrow streets of the city. As Jesus is walking through these narrow streets, everyone is touching him; and yet all the sudden he turns and asks “who touched me?” Why wouldn’t she just approach him like the rest? Because she is already a social outcast, and so she stays on the edges and then reaches out and touches the edge of his garment. It is important to note that in ancient times there is a hem along the bottom of the traditional garment that represents the Abrahamic covenant— this actually represented posterity & fertility. So for this outcast woman with the issue of blood to touch the hem of his garment, is actually quite significant. The fringes that come out from under the shirts of those Jewish people we see in modern time, those are actually reminders of the same thing, the Abrahamic covenants. So when she touches him, he immediately feels the ‘virtue’ leave him, but this word virtue actually means power, so he felt his ‘power’ leave him and turns to ask who touched him. So just the hope of the promise of touching the blue hem along the garment to partake and have children according to the Abrahamic covenant. All of us have hopes and dreams, the woman was hopeless because she would not have blessings and because of her faith, Jesus promises that those hopes and dreams be fulfilled. This was very significant for me, I remember being very moved by this story. Not only did I have my own ‘issue of blood’ as a teenager, that luckily was corrected thanks to modern medicine. But I am now also 33 years old, have a great career, have dated a lot, but somehow it never ends up working out. I feel that my hopes and dreams are slipping away for my own dream of having children and a family. Most of my friends are now married, some divorced and remarried, I look at pictures of children on Facebook and it makes my heart ache ever so slightly. I try to push this feeling off as, ‘don’t be jealous’, but I also need to acknowlege that it is a real feeling, that the loss I am beginning to feel is real and not just based on jealousy. In my religious culture, the women get married VERY young, so being 33 now I’m sort of a misfit and in my own way, feel a little like an outcast as well. So I identify with this woman completely, on so many levels. If there was a way to heal some of the more painful things I have felt over the years, if there was some person that I could just be near that would erase all of that, I would do whatever I had to- to heal the broken heart and my fading dreams. Now I don’t want you to think that I am depressed and focusing my life on this, I have a wonderful career where I get to care for and heal people myself. I work in the Medical field and it brings a sense of fulfillment and healing when I can heal others physical ailments, its like a portion of my emotional ailments (aka fading dreams and broken heart) that are buried so deep are slowly being healed as well. I don’t know if I will get married or have children, I don’t know that ‘it will all work out’, I feel like slapping people who say ‘oh you still have time’ — one thing I do know is that I’m happy with where I’m at right now, I have dealt with these demons (aka heartaches) & know that God will shape my life in such a way that I will always be able to feel my soul is fulfilled in other ways. Even if the ways that he directs me to fulfill my soul are not the ways I would have thought or wished, I know he will take care of me & help me survive & flourish until the end of my days on Earth. Next we go to The Church of Primacy of Peter…. [gallery ids="1403,1401" type="square" columns="2"] At this point in Peters life, he has been witness to the resurrection and all the miracles and the life of Jesus Christ. In my own way, I think of this as a great movie or tv series of sorts…. you get into the story, into the characters, and then all the sudden the funding for the series is cut. Or think about if they were opening a Disneyland or some other theme park near you, and you see it being built, the send out commercials on TV you are excited, your kids are excited — then the whole theme park is blown up or destroyed in an earthquake. Or you just built a house, your down payment is settled, and you have all your furniture bought and ready to move in; then find out your best friend betrayed you and took your matches and lit your house on fire. I think of Peter at this time, how he must have felt, the guilt of betraying Jesus, maybe feeling slightly unworthy to carry on the cause, maybe felt like it was all over now that Jesus was gone, maybe trying to lay low so that the Romans wouldn’t come for him next. So Peter ends up doing what he knows how to do best, he goes back to fishing….. While he is fishing, he is interrupted by a figure on the beach calling out to him, “children have you caught anything?” The stranger said to cast the net on the right side of the boat. This is the same sort of incidence and likely a deja vu moment for them & suddenly the recognized that this was no stranger, this was their Savior. Peter ends up leaping over the side of the boat, and swims to shore. IMG_3180 Jesus then asks Peter, “Do you love me more than all of this? (meaning fishing)” Peter responds yes of course, and Jesus asks him 3 more times, and here we see Jesus in his mercy allow Peter to love him 3 times. In a way I think this was a tender mercy for him, in denying him when he needed his support the most, and now he allows him to love him 3 times — I like to think that this is the first time we see Jesus offer the Atonement for all this is had been and all that it will be, to one of his Best Friends and Disciples. Then Jesus asks him, why he is there? I imagine him saying to Peter, why are you here at the same place, at the same shore…fishing? If Jesus wanted fish, then he could get them. He is likely asking, ‘I need you to feed my sheep, I need dedicated Apostles, those who will labor/teach/love/serve loyally about me and my gospel’. He is asking Peter to go out, and nourish the souls of those who believe and continue to believe in him. Its about gathering his children. It is here that Jesus ‘calls’ Peter to lead his Church at that time and era; and Peter finally gets it, its about protecting and preaching– and for the rest of Peter’s life, we see that he is never the same after this event. Next we go to Bet Shean…. IMG_3254 This is a ‘house of security’, it dates back to 1468 B.C., what you see today began in 1986 — $20million was spent on this site to preserve it. Now it is the best preserved Roman and Byzantine period city in Israel. Interestingly only about 10% of the city has actually been excavated. Its sister city is Jerash, across the Jordan River. The population of this city rose to about 40,000. It was destroyed in the great earthquake of 747 A.D. Located on the fault line of the Great Rift Valley. Beth Shean has significance in both Old and New Testaments. It became known as Scythopolis, 18 archeological strata have been identified ranging from 4000 BC to 8th century AD. [gallery ids="1420,1421,1422,1423" type="rectangular"] Old Testament Significance: The city was assigned to Manasseh (Josh 17:11), but the Israelities could not conquer it because of the iron chariots of the Canaanites (Josh 17:16; Judges 1:27). When Saul dies in the battle with the Philistines, they take his armor and puts it on display in the town’s temple of Ashtoreth and hung his headless body on the city wall (1 Sam 31:10-12). New Testament Significance: Capital city (and largest) of the Decapolis–which included Damascus and Philadelphia (Amman). It was the only city of the Decapolis on western side of the Jordan River. It is mentioned three times in the New Testament (Matt 4:25; Mark 5:20; 7:31). [gallery ids="1424,1426,1425,1427,1428,1429,1430,1431,1432,1433,1434,1435,1436,1437,1438" type="slideshow"]  ]]>